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Beginner theory of music

1954pip

Member
Messages
124
hi can anyone recomend a good book on the theory of music as i have started with no knowledge at all about music, i don't want anything to heavy but i want to try to get a basic knowledge,working knowledge?
pip
 

Sunray

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,708
Hope these help ...

I am wading through this one at present mate ...

It's OK ... Easy enough to get you started ...

There are many free on-line resources as well to help you ... [Here are a couple of links] ;}

Link1

Link2

Link3
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
Messages
2,773
How to Read Music by James Sleigh and Mike Sheppard, very good with a complementary Website.
Very good and covers the basics plus a bit
 

Sweet Dreamer

Senior Member
Messages
505
I haven't watched these yet myself so I don't know if they are any good or not, but this guy Lypur has a whole slew of music theory videos on youtube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gHEIF0rT2w
I'm on dial-up. I actually downloaded this video to see what it was like. Well, this is way too basic for me. At the rate this guy teaches it's going to be a very long time before he gets into anything interesting.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
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21,947

stefank

Member
Messages
366
Theory of music is best taught in a "practical application" context. What do you want/feel you need to know?

Having said that, I love the Dolmetsch site (Sunray's first link).
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Couldn't agree more with Stefank on this one - there is potentially a lot to learn so it would be good to know what your priorities are - for some it might be understanding what the lines mean that music is written on, what a treble clef is, what a scale is, why some notes are written different to others, what 4/4 or 6/8 means and so on. I would recommend both getting one of the books mentioned above and also finding someone to ask questions about it so that your learning is overseen in some way. I'd be happy to act as a mentor, for example, as I imagine so would others. Just let us know......

Good Luck
Kind regards
Tom
 

1954pip

Member
Messages
124
hi many thanks to allhave replied ijust feeliammissing some thing but also i need to try to under how to convert the writen word into music ,i know that does not make a lot of sense but i suppose that willcome with more practice.
but i would like to understand writen music more.
pip
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
but i would like to understand writen music more.
pip
I think the secret to that is to play from the written music, lookup the things you don't know, and eventually you'll be able to hear the tune in your head from reading. Takes some of us (like me) a long time, though. It may help if you do some interval training/exercises. Good stuff on the site I posted a link to earlier.
 

stefank

Member
Messages
366
i would like to understand writen music more.
It's basically a two step process:

1. Learning/understanding.

2, Applying that knowledge to convert the dots into sounds.

When you can do step two without having to think (too much) about it, you have won.
 

swampster247

New Member
Messages
3
Music theory for idiots is a good read, along the lines of music theory for dummies but the second edition is supplied with a cd to aid ear training. Have a look!!!
 

visionari1

Senior Member
Messages
1,581
TomMapfumo;37459 " I would recommend both getting one of the books mentioned above and also finding someone to ask questions about it so that your learning is overseen in some way. I'd be happy to act as a mentor said:
Hi Tom,

I would welcome this!

I know theory has been holding back my understanding & ability to improvise.
Years ago I went to the Aebersold Jazz week in Louiville Kentucky and all of the theory went over my head.
Have lately been focusing on scales learning by ear and figuring out how to get so fluid with all the various ones.
I have most of the material (I think) sometimes too much choice is overpowering & confusing, so I would welcome some advice/mentoring around theory in relation to playing through the changes including how one fits this into a practise shedule.
I think one can practise scales till the cows come home, yet don't understand the theory enough to make it really come alive in being able to play at a Jam session, for instance.

Your thoughts on this Tom!

Cheers
Jimu
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi Jimu!

I'd probably benefit from a little more clarification from you linking improvisation, scales, and jamming, as I am not sure how you would define your aims in this regard. I would find this helpful in order to know how to pitch a response - feel free to PM me on this.

Kind regards
Tom
 
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