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The tennis season and early music.

old git

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Having attended a school founded by an actor well known to Shakespeare, a writer about tennis (the Royal variety in Henry V) decided to research the earliest musical reference to tennis.

Spent a considerable time but so far it appears to be Handel's "And every volley shall be exalted"

Serious suggestions on tennis and the other racket games welcomed.
 

navarro

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Hi old git Charles Raquet (1597–1664) was a French organist and composer. I think you might just want references in music so here is one "King Henry the fifths conquest of France" a ballad allegedly celebrating the Battle of Agincourt and the events surrounding it. In the ballad King Henry sends his page to France to collect a tribute in gold instead the French king sends back 3 tennis balls so that the young king can learn to play. These are the words in the ballad.. Regds N
 
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Sunray

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Having attended a school founded by an actor well known to Shakespeare, a writer about tennis (the Royal variety in Henry V) decided to research the earliest musical reference to tennis.

Spent a considerable time but so far it appears to be Handel's "And every volley shall be exalted"

Serious suggestions on tennis and the other racket games welcomed.

I thought "you" were "Mr Big" when it comes to all kinds of Racket's ... :)))

Sorry OG ...

I just couldn't' resist ... ;}
 

Young Col

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Had to dredge my knowledge of Shakespeare:
In response to the gift of a "tun of treasure" - "Tennis balls, my liege" (Exeter), Henry V says:
"When we have march'd our rackets to these balls,
We will, in France, by God's grace, play a set"

I always thought that there was a double meaning: Henry respected the Duke of Burgundy as a musician and in playing a set, was actually inviting him to a jam.

BTW, OG, presumably that nice Roy Hodgson taught tennis at your old school when he was PE teacher there. Probably a couple of years after you left though....
 

old git

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Had to dredge my knowledge of Shakespeare:
In response to the gift of a "tun of treasure" - "Tennis balls, my liege" (Exeter), Henry V says:
"When we have march'd our rackets to these balls,
We will, in France, by God's grace, play a set"

I always thought that there was a double meaning: Henry respected the Duke of Burgundy as a musician and in playing a set, was actually inviting him to a jam.

BTW, OG, presumably that nice Roy Hodgson taught tennis at your old school when he was PE teacher there. Probably a couple of years after you left though....

You could be right YC. Further investigation needed as the speech carries on "That will strike his father's crown into the hazard" The hazard, as the learned members will already know, in that case, there is no point in telling them. However his father was the King of France, perhaps a reference to Nat "King" Cole? It's a shame Shakespeare used blank verse as if he used quatrains, there would be other fascinating connections.

For those bewildered by the depth of knowledge required to appreciate the implications of this discussion. To strike into the Hazard is way of the winning points in Real Tennis that existed many centuries prior to the invention of the upstart game emanating from AECaLTC, Worple Road, Wimbledon.
 

Young Col

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....and of course calling a chase is clearly a reference to it being time for a chase chorus. Always a hazard(ous) venture.

Shakespeare, prescient as ever, obviously understood the dangers of building the Roland Garros stadium without a roof when he wrote
We will, in France, by God's grace, play a set

The French open final was held up for several minutes by rain.
 

Tenor Viol

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The Agincourt Carol is of course the required music (Deo Gratias Anglia). Wiki page is here. I have a copy of a modern performing edition of the music, which I sang at a workshop a few years ago.
 

Young Col

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A roof, A roof, my kingdom for a roof...
:)))....or a penthouse if it was for real tennis.

TV -Is "ans somme" medieval for Ann Summers, or am I mistranslating?
Anyway, I recall Agincourt Carol is the sister of German Nick and Belgian Tom (one for Spike Milligan fans).
 

Tenor Viol

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:)))....or a penthouse if it was for real tennis.

TV -Is "ans somme" medieval for Ann Summers, or am I mistranslating?
Anyway, I recall Agincourt Carol is the sister of German Nick and Belgian Tom (one for Spike Milligan fans).

Groan.

Here is one perfromance of it. This is a more modern one style wise (Maddy Prior). I have a slight problem with both of these performances - it should be male voices as it woud have been sung by war veterans in taverns etc.
 

old git

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Why are you so centred on Agincourt? What about the speech before Hardcourt?

Apologise for the lack of music.
 

Young Col

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Young Col;77280 Anyway said:
....and GermanKev?

I think Shakespeare was making an oblique Nostradamus type reference to the Duke of Burgundy too. He actually meant the New Orleans clarinetist George Lewis, who lived on Burgundy Street. His Burgundy Street Blues must be the most heartfelt, completely impovised blues ever recorded in New Orleans music.
 

old git

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Doh! What a bunch useless twoggies.

Nobody queried the reference to the speech before Hardcourt suggesting that it should read Harfleur. As we are all aware, Harfleur is how New Orleans clarinetists refer to Petite Fleur. Interestingly enough, Hardcourt was twinned with Harfleur although only one hundred cubits apart.

George Lewis is John Lewis's father and obviously founder of the mutual store.
 

Young Col

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What, you mean John Lewis the MJQ pianist is one and the same as the bloke who started the eponymous "never knowingly undersold" department stores and owns Waite, Rose and Taylor's, the grocers?
 
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