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Accessories The sax seat

Wade Cornell

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@Hackenbush ...just FYI, stumbled across THIS via the "Other Forum"....perhaps might be something which is interesting to you given your ergonomic challenges ?

I'd like to see this discussed in a separate thread as there potentially are some interesting questions like why the comparison is only with neck straps and as we know there are other far less expensive alternatives. No accommodation for soprano where tendonitis is an issue and especially posture (head and horn down). I'm also curious about how many players play almost exclusively standing (which the seat doesn't accommodate).

It's an interesting piece of gear that may be of use to some, but otherwise...Are you going to add that to the gear you take to a gig?
 
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JayeNM

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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1,351
I'd like to see this discussed in a separate thread as there potentially are some interesting questions like why the comparison is only with neck straps and as we know there are other far less expensive alternatives. No accommodation for soprano where tendonitis is an issue and especially posture (head and horn down). I'm also curious about how many players play almost exclusively standing (which the seat doesn't accommodate).

It's an interesting piece of gear that may be of use to some, but otherwise...Are you going to add that to the gear you take to a gig?
I agree it's off-topic, and didn't meant to digress this thread. It was just the issue of horn weight has come up here, and I'd like to believe that issue can be addressed without having to eschew your favorite piece of brass hardware and replace it with a piece of plastic.

I think it becomes a question of use for those who actually are challenged by chronic orthopaedic, soft tissue, or nerve problems where, in fact, the harnesses have not proven to be the ticket. I think this could be a good little apparatus. Most feedback on it over at the 'other' forum has been favorable.

In a situation such as any sort of stage band or orchestra, players are seated. Visibility of the unit would be quite limited. I doubt greatly any band director would shake their head at a player using one of these - if the player had good reason. The notion that "other bandmates are gonna make fun of me"...dunno what to say about that, really (?) Between avoiding pain vs. (initially) being ribbed a bit....seems the former trumps the latter by quite a bit, to me....

In a smaller group situation, say a lone sax player in a sextet or something, I don't think it'd be any stranger than a guitarist or vocalist or string bass player using a stool...which isn't all that uncommon to see these days, either.

OK sorry...back to the Plastic UnFantastic.....
 

Wade Cornell

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I agree it's off-topic, and didn't meant to digress this thread. It was just the issue of horn weight has come up here, and I'd like to believe that issue can be addressed without having to eschew your favorite piece of brass hardware and replace it with a piece of plastic.

I think it becomes a question of use for those who actually are challenged by chronic orthopaedic, soft tissue, or nerve problems where, in fact, the harnesses have not proven to be the ticket. I think this could be a good little apparatus. Most feedback on it over at the 'other' forum has been favorable.

In a situation such as any sort of stage band or orchestra, players are seated. Visibility of the unit would be quite limited. I doubt greatly any band director would shake their head at a player using one of these - if the player had good reason. The notion that "other bandmates are gonna make fun of me"...dunno what to say about that, really (?) Between avoiding pain vs. (initially) being ribbed a bit....seems the former trumps the latter by quite a bit, to me....

In a smaller group situation, say a lone sax player in a sextet or something, I don't think it'd be any stranger than a guitarist or vocalist or string bass player using a stool...which isn't all that uncommon to see these days, either.

OK sorry...back to the Plastic UnFantastic.....
I simply thought it would be a good topic outside of this context. Agreed that it's relevant to the OP, and wasn't inferring that it was off topic. Still just thinking that it's possibly something that could be discussed here (in another thread). The issue of band mates laughing, and such never entered my mind, but for some it could be ? It's having another BIG bit of gear to lug around that I'd consider a problem. A gig that I used to do regularly at a little club in an old section of town had me parking between six and eight blocks away . Just carrying two horns and a stand was enough of a burden.

It seems like it could be beneficial to someone who only plays at home and plays baritone, alto or tenor and they have a major physical problem. The question is how necessary is it otherwise? The comparisons given are strictly against a neck strap. Well, it's obvious that anything and everything is better than that, but there are other solutions that may be more practical and portable. It's a fair topic as GAS is rampant in sax sites and I frankly don't see the need unless you are physically impaired. It was a good call JayeNM for this thread and a creative solution for the OP's problem. Could also make a good thread for others with similar problems (where they wouldn't necessarily have known the association with a plastic horn). It's also good to shed some light on a bit of gear/GAS that's obviously being sold as good for everybody (recommended by Chiropractors, better for your health, etc.). If you're a competitive bicycle rider and develop vertigo, it may be time to stop riding a bicycle instead of putting training wheels on. For someone who needs the exercise and just goes around the block on the sidewalk, training wheels may be a good solution.
 
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JayeNM

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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We pretty much agree. I also would not use one in place of a good 'ol strap but I know that at my age I have perhaps another decade where I'll likely be able to support my instruments pain-free. I can already feel certain sporadic aches beginning to introduce themselves.
But I do 'know' (as in 'internet know') several players who really have some physical issues..
 

ChampagneBears

New Member
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28
I wonder if this would be good to use to help prevent repetitive stress injury. I’m a beginner, nowhere near a gigging musician. If I practice at home, by the end of an hour, I find myself trying to rest the bottom of my horn on my seat, as I’m starting to tire. If I practice 2 hours I’m sure my neck and back will start to ache. If I practice 7 days a week at home...I’m not sure how long I could sustain that without being tired and hurt all the time. I can see this chair working as a home practice tool, just to relieve some of the stress when not gigging or practicing in a band outside of the home.
 

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
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I recommend people wait for it to come out. Kickstarter and Indigogo projects are notorious for coming out late and having initial problems. In fairness, a mechanical device is less likely to suffer, as it doesn't depend on an app (I hope?).
 

Wade Cornell

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Thanks to JayeNM for posting this as a separate topic. Keeping ourselves in good condition and not sustaining injury is important. The sax seat may be good for those who have physical problems that would otherwise prevent them playing. I'm less sure that it should be recommended to fit players. There are other discussion on this site about straps, harnesses, and over the shoulder types of gear that are a lot cheaper than this would be and totally portable.

Around the neck straps are always gong to put strain on your neck and I'd recommend almost anything else for heavier instruments.

One of the worst saxes for RSI would be the straight soprano. Played properly (not pointed at the floor) it can result in tendonitis. The sax seat does nothing for this, nor does any other strap that I know of. Playing a curvy soprano instead is the only answer I know of.

Preventing injury is always a good idea, but I'm not convinced that the sax seat is the right answer for the majority.
 

Vetinari

Senior Member
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1,130
For bari or bass there is the Kaling stand, can be used sitting or standing, but, it's very heavey, large and costly (£500 plus) :eek:

Can be adjusted to almost any angle or hieght.
Kaling sax stand.jpg
 

Wade Cornell

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For bari or bass there is the Kaling stand, can be used sitting or standing, but, it's very heavey, large and costly (£500 plus) :eek:

Can be adjusted to almost any angle or hieght.
View attachment 14219
We don't know how expensive the sax seat will be , but unlikely to be cheaper, or easier to lug around. At least the Kaling stand looks like it folds up. If someone has a physical problem with the weight of a sax then large heavy gear isn't going to suit them either if they are lugging it around. This did bring to mind that it wouldn't be difficult to modify a microphone stand to suit a straight soprano, but it would look fairly cheesy in a professional setting.
 

Vetinari

Senior Member
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1,130
Base section of the Kaling is a heavy duty cymbal stand by the look of it. The top section is available in two versions, bari or bass.
 

tenorviol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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A decent harness will address most of the issues, certainly taking the weight off neck and shoulders.
@ChampagneBears - are you taking weight or lifting with right thumb? You should on use that to push sax away from you with no weight on it
 

Saxodent

Member
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160
I like the concept but cannot see how it will work outside a practice room.
If the support part is transportable and able to be fitted to a standard gig chair then it may have more merit.
 

Saxodent

Member
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160
There is a device at Sax UK for just straight Sopranos that takes all the weight off it.
Thanks to JayeNM for posting this as a separate topic. Keeping ourselves in good condition and not sustaining injury is important. The sax seat may be good for those who have physical problems that would otherwise prevent them playing. I'm less sure that it should be recommended to fit players. There are other discussion on this site about straps, harnesses, and over the shoulder types of gear that are a lot cheaper than this would be and totally portable.

Around the neck straps are always gong to put strain on your neck and I'd recommend almost anything else for heavier instruments.

One of the worst saxes for RSI would be the straight soprano. Played properly (not pointed at the floor) it can result in tendonitis. The sax seat does nothing for this, nor does any other strap that I know of. Playing a curvy soprano instead is the only answer I know of.

Preventing injury is always a good idea, but I'm not convinced that the sax seat is the right answer for the majority.
 
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JayeNM

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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1,351
For bari or bass there is the Kaling stand, can be used sitting or standing, but, it's very heavey, large and costly (£500 plus) :eek:
This is actually just a modern take on a very old-school stand which bari players used in the BB era. I have one of the originals (came with a horn I once acquired).....it really does work great and this one is not heavy at all, but still very stable.

No particular reason one could not be scaled for Tenor or Alto....


IMGP1877.jpg
 

Vetinari

Senior Member
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1,130
it would need to be a bit taller and more subtantial to be used while playing standing
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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I have an Adams stand for bari sax - a more modern version of the Kaling stand.
It works, but the saxophone seems to get in the way of seeing the music - I have to have my music stand very high. And it is impossible to share a stand. I've gone back to using a harness.
 
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