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The Pentatonic Scale Rules...

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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What a fantastic video. Bobby McFerrin is an incredible musician, and this demonstrates not only his understanding of music - but also the other side of it - how audiences relate/interact with music.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
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5,219
I just love the pentatonic scales - Major and Minor - such a lovely joyful sound, and an inevitable part of my warm up routine - really connects! Thanks, Chris, for a fascinating video...........!

Kind regards
Tom
 

visionari1

Senior Member
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1,581
Brilliant.....See how he improvises from vitually nothing with ease....the way of a true master... apparently with mostly the pentatonic scale you can be a very competant creative musician.

Thanks for posting this!

ciao Jimu
 

old git

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5,545
Somewhere, no, not over the rainbow, I've read that most very early instruments, things like bone whistles seem to use the pentatonic scale, no matter what culture, continent or clan developed it. Similarly, baby's comfort songs, such as "The Galloping Major" mimic the rhythms of walking as felt in the first comfort zone, the womb. Might be interesting to see if similar scales seem to play a part in calls used by our closest relatives or other animals.
 

AlanU

Member
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655
Very interesting, and fun.
It reminds me of a series of lectures for children by Wynton Marsalis, that I saw many years ago.
I'll go and look for them now.
 

old git

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5,545
The Marsalis were brilliant, related blues to classical, if I remember correctly.
 

AlanU

Member
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655
That's right, The Nut Cracker Suite among other things.

I've just found that it is on You Tube, called 'Marsalis on music'.
I'm off to give it a look.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
That's right, The Nut Cracker Suite among other things.

I've just found that it is on You Tube, called 'Marsalis on music'.
I'm off to give it a look.
That's well worth a look. Funny in places, especially Yo-Yo Ma at the end.
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
In the same kind of vein, I recommend the John Kirby Sextet (1939 -41) who alongside standards of the day also recorded their take on many classical themes. All beautifully tight, cool, laid back and swinging. Bounce of the Sugar Plum Fairy, Beethoven Riffs On, Anitra's Dance, Minute Waltz and Humouresque included. This kind of arrangement was the precursor for the tight arrangements, often with Kirby's bass carrying the rhythmic momentum, that when merged with modern harmonic progressions emerged as bebop.

Also for a tour de force on Humouresque listen to Art Tatum's version, with it's astonishing runs, apparent playing out of time (like Earl Hines used to do) and incorporation of Harlem stride.

YC
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
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5,545
Could be part of the series we were referring to. Do recall that amongst other things, blues were compared with sonata form.

Please computer literate youngsters, find the series somewhere, they were brill.
 
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