Supporting   special needs music

The Path to Being In Tune

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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21,468
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Just north of Munich
What does one do while on the "path to playing in tune"? Chop wood and carry water.
What does one do once they have arrived at "playing in tune"? Chop wood and carry water
Have to agree. That's very Zentered.
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
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Oneonta, NY
I've been following this thread and find it very illuminating. On the advice of @jbtsax, I started working on playing with a looser embouchure in February. I now have an alto mouthpiece pitch of concert E (below the A=880).

It took some time, but once I got used to it, my intonation and tone improved dramatically. I am a fanatic about practicing long tones and overtones daily, so that obviously helps tremendously.

I am interested in the debate over whether it is better to adjust pitch with lip pressure or the oral cavity. I have read in a number of places (Dave Liebman's Developing a Personal Sound on the Saxophone being the primary) that lip pressure should remain constant and pitch is adjusted using the shape of the oral cavity and the larynx. Part of the oral cavity is being able to raise the soft palate on higher notes, especially altissimo. Using the exercises in the book, I have developed the ability to do this. At least it works for me. I have conscious control over the oral cavity. Previously, I had never been able to hit even an out of tune altissimo note. I can now hit up to the C and play up to the A fairly well when improvising.

I am very interested in hearing how the experienced players here in the Café adjust pitch. Lip, oral cavity? I am always eager to learn more.
 

jbtsax

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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
I used to think that the pitch could be adjusted by keeping the embouchure constant and adjusting the oral cavity. Pete Thomas helped to convince me that I was in fact making small changes with the embouchure which changed the pitch thinking it was done by using the oral cavity.

After further study, I learned that the oral cavity can change the pitch, but only in a very limited range of the saxophone around high A and above. In fact there are exercises in which the player plays a D with the palm key and then plays C#, C, B etc. keeping the same fingering and embouchure. I still have a lot more to learn about all of this.
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
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3,947
Locality
Manchester, UK
I am very interested in hearing how the experienced players here in the Café adjust pitch. Lip, oral cavity? I am always eager to learn more.
I don't know. I do know that my intonation and tuning get much better when I'm paying attention to them. When I can hear in my mind the line I'm about to play my body somehow knows what to do to make it sound like that.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
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16,013
Locality
Burnley bb9 9dn
It all becomes automatic, especially with a well worked piece. Sometimes I'm so busy listening, I forget it's me playing and then it all goes sideways. I have no idea what's happening biologically/anatomically, It's like eating. As soon as you think about chewing, you bite your tongue.
 

Ivan

Undecided
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8,019
Locality
Peeblesshire
I am very interested in hearing how the experienced players here in the Café adjust pitch. Lip, oral cavity? I am always eager to learn more
. I have no idea what's happening biologically/anatomically. It's like eating. As soon as you think about chewing, you bite your tongue.
The Colin has put it in a nutshell, again

For me:

Play what you like to play, even notes at complete randon and listen to your sound. Listen like you are the audience

I think that if you listen to what you sound like, you've got somewhere to go to
 

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