The famous saxophone growl...

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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Yep, I've got a pair or Sennheiser headphones that do this. They're great around the house as well. Especially when I'm trying to listen to something and my wife's playing the piano, or guitar (not that she plays badly, she doesn't, but there are times when I want to listen to something different).
 

BrianJoeSandy

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Daventry near enough
This is a well known phenomenon. If you are playing A 440 and I am playing sharp at 444 per second then if we start together after a 1/4 second you will have expended 110 beats and I will have done 111 and we will be together for the first time. This happens again at 1/2 and 3/4 seconds. So every 1/4 second we reinforce each other and that is what you can hear a beat of 4 per second. I think that's it.
 

johnboy

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On the subject of Luftwaffe twin engine bombers. The R.A.F. multi engined aircraft were synchronized (don't ask me how). The Luftwaffes' weren't, and being out of phase, produced a throbbing sound.

Mine of useless information.
johnboy.
 

Young Col

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Coulsdon, London/Surrey
No two piston engines are going to run at exactly the same rpm for the same throttle settings, especially 60odd years ago, hence the in/out of phase noise that was produced. Synchronising the rpm as closely as possible will obviously minimise the noise. It could be done manually but needed the constant attention of a flight engineer – very tedious. Hydro-mechanical systems made it much easier. Today it can all be done with electronics. Synchronising systems are not used on take off and landing as it’s safer to have direct control over engines during critical phases of flight. The Luftwaffe decided they could make savings by not providing flight engineers and/or synchronising systems, so the crews had to put up with the changing low pitched noise - and no doubt other in-flight engineer needs (so probably all their twin engined planes did this, not just specific engine types, as in my earlier post). They also saved time and money by not training their navigators to the level of, say, the RAF, something we were able to turn to our advantage – but that’s another, fascinating, story!
Yes, there’s useless information here too!
YC
 

johnboy

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Hi YC
I totally agree with you! I fly a Russian Sturmovik IL2 on a regular basis. I do find it terribly slow compaired to the Mk9 Spit.
The problem I have at the moment is that my Cyborg joystick has packed up, so I'm grounded for the foreseeable future.
These Ubisoft combat flight sims. are brilliant. I'm to scared to progress to the twin engine "Mossie" variants yet. At least until Father Christmas brings me a new stick!

johnboy
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Useless information?
Not if you were on the ground during World War 2.
Wonder if those concrete listening dish operators used the technique for distinguishing between returning British bombers and Axis raiders? Without IFF, they would be just bright spots on the Cathode Ray displays on Radio Aid to Direction And Range systems of the period.
Now what's useless about that?
Just a further thought, wonder if a bass saxophone with all the pads closed would act as a directional listening device?
 

johnboy

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Sounds a bit "Dickensian" to me. I bet it would work though, especially if ????? ?????? had anything to do with it!
Sorry senior moment can't think of a base player!
What about Sahib Shehab (something like that)?

johnboy.
 
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johnboy

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You can take something for that, - it's called alcohol.
What are you doing on the 'puter at 5.27 in the morning. I know the Forum is adictive, but 5.27!! I had only been in bed for 30 minutes, having just played a very bad gig (loads of bum notes, - from my wife telling me not to drink so mutch).
 

Young Col

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Coulsdon, London/Surrey
...Adrian Rollini
The long and relatively narrow horn could give it a very sharp null away from the beam heading, but the sharp resonance means it might only be useful for detecting the direction of other bass saxes.
YC
 

johnboy

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Hey Col, I'm glad you'r "switched on" today, but then youngsters always are. We poor old folk have too much information stored in our memories, which are a bit like reel to reel tape recorders. It takes ages for the bit we want to come round, it happened to me last night at a gig (my wife says it was the beer), 10 pints wouldn't do that, would it?

johnboy.
 
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gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
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manchester
Hey Col, I'm glad you'r "switched on" today, but then youngsters always are. We poor old folk have too much information stored in our memories, which are a bit like reel to reel tape recorders. It takes ages for the bit we want to come round, it happened to me last night at a gig (my wife says it was the beer), 10 pints wouldn't do that, would it?

johnboy.
What's a reel to reel tape recorder!!!! oh dam is that another thing I've forgotten:(
 

JTMaul

New Member
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14
My sax tends to make something resembling a growl whenever I get down to bottom C. But I don't think it's what you're asking about.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
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Location
ISLE OF WIGHT, UK
Am I missing something here - growl & edge. My understanding of the growl, was that you made a hawking motion in your throat, (thats what works for me),while edge was achieved by singing/humming?

John.
 
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