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Tenor Viol's musings

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
Thanks @rhysonsax. Yes, some activities like team sports have detailed information available, but music doesn't, despite more people being actively involved in music-making activities than football, for example. I strongly suspect the May and/or June dates will slip.
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
Somewhat more random post than usual...

Despite the many and often painful challenges of the last year, there have been a few good things. One has been something called the 'Virtual Astronomy Club'. I was sent a link for it last April and they basically have a regular (currently fortnightly, was weekly then) Zoom meeting. They mostly get a speaker in to talk for about an hour. It's run by a guy I did know back in the 90s as we were both on the same national committee for astronomy and used to meet at committee meetings in London.

This week was the 'anniversary' of the 'club' and had a 'big name' speaker lined up. They have had some good speakers over the year. Being online, they've been able to get people from the USA which you'd never normally be able to get anywhere near.

This week it was Prof. Jim Al-Khalili who is very well known in the UK as populariser of science. He has a long-running series on Radio 4 'The Life Scientific' where he interviews leading scientists about their life and work. He's a theoretical physicist and his talk was about the current state of physics and why a 'grand unified theory' is no nearer now than 40 years ago when Steven Hawking though it was 'near'.

He's a really good speaker. I got to ask a question, which was: will the next major breakthrough in physics be driven by improvements in measurements or by developments in mathematics? His view was most likely to be improved observations and experiments.

(In case you're wondering about the question, historically both of those have driven developments. Newton and calculus. Improved observational accuracy led to discovering problems with the position of Mercury, which led to Relativity, but that required development of tensor calculus....)
 

rhysonsax

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That sounds really good. Have the talks been recorded and might they be available to members of the public, such as those who frequent Cafe Sax ?

Rhys
 

Sue

One prosecco, two prosecco, three prosecco - floor
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John (hubby) loves these videos and talks. There was a small observatory opened in Allenheads a few years ago - North Pennines Astronomy Society but sadly, like everything else, has been on hold. I hope they manage to open again. We are lucky with lots of dark skies near us and John often drags me (kicking and screaming against the cold) for photography purposes. I do enjoy star gazing when I get there though :)
 

mizmar

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Trondheim, Norway
(In case you're wondering about the question, historically both of those have driven developments. Newton and calculus. Improved observational accuracy led to discovering problems with the position of Mercury, which led to Relativity, but that required development of tensor calculus....)
hummmm.... one might argue that Tycho Brahe's excruciating measurements allowed for Keplers laws which Newton explained... inventing calculus to do so, based on the (capital P-Physics) inspiration that the moon is a lump of rock much as a rock (or apple) on earth and subject to gravity in the same way (and Hooks idea about inverse square laws)... Equally Special Relativity required observation (no effect from the ether), maths (thanks Lorentz) and (capital P-Physics) inspiration (relative velocity invariance / symmetry) ... general relativity did require highfalutin maths etc. but also inspiration equating acceleration and gravity (symmetry)...
 
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Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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6,319
Location
Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
hummmm.... one might argue that Tycho Brahe's excruciating measurements allowed for Keplers laws which Newton explained... inventing calculus to do so, based on the (capital P-Physics) inspiration that the moon is a lump of rock much as a rock (or apple) on earth and subject to gravity in the same way (and Hooks idea about inverse square laws)... Equally Special Relativity required observation (no effect from the ether), maths (thanks Lorentz) and (capital P-Physics) inspiration (relative velocity invariance / symmetry) ... general relativity did require highfalutin maths etc. but also inspiration equating acceleration and gravity (symmetry)...
My comment was highly simplified.
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
After more poor weather and inability to do any astrophotography (yes, it was clear on Saturday night for some, but I seem to have had the edge of the weather system over me...) I've been inveigled into other things. My photography course covers a wide range of subjects / topics and one is 'photo-books', a genre which has taken off int eh last 20 years or so.

As part of my course work I have to produce my own photo-book, which includes having to print and bind it. So, I have fallen into a rabbit hole of watching videos ono bookbinding and scouring the internet to buy some basic kit so that I can make my photo-book (uni does provide some kit and tools as well).
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
Indeed, that's my point. either maths or observation is a too simplified model of scientific development.
I was trying to make a basic point that 'many' not 'all' scientific breakthrough are frequently linked to two things: improved observational accuracies, usually due to equipment/technical/technological improvements, or to developments in mathematics, which enables explanations of things which were previously inexplicable, etc.

Tycho / Kepler made very accurate observations, which led to the conclusion that the planets moved in elliptical, not circular, orbits. Newton / Leibniz developed calculus which enabled better modelling / predictions etc.

Increased accuracy of the observations of the position of Mercury led to a realisation that 'classical' Newtonian mechanics did not explain Mercury's position in the sky. Einstein's developments were able to do that...
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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I never expected to be creating a book... not only taking the photos for it, but physically producing and binding it... Anyone got a cast iron nipping press going spare? The photo is only a mock-up to test some things out

IMG_7341.JPG
 

David Dorning

Senior Member
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737
Location
Chichester, UK
You can - I’ve got two pieces of marine ply and four lengths of threaded rod and some wing nuts
That’s ok for a long press while things dry out, but the essence of a nipping press is the ability to give a quick nip before things like endpapers start to move about. Easy to quickly spin the handle but not so easy with four wingnuts. Your local record office might have a nipping press you could go and use if you ask nicely.
 

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