SYOS

Strip a Sax

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
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3,410
I have stripped a couple of saxes in the past and basically used very fine wet and dry and scotch bright cloths to do the job but it's a very slow laborious job I have tried a few well known chemical strippers but they seem to have little or no effect on the lacquer used on saxes.
Can anyone recommend something that does the job easily and does boiling a sax do the job every time or at all because I worry that it might cause all sorts of problems.
Any advise much appreciated
 
OP
gladsaxisme

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
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3,410
Never mind I have just found the resent relevant thread that seems to answer most of my queries but I am surprised the boiling doesn't seem to cause any problems
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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5,833
but I am surprised the boiling doesn't seem to cause any problems
Bad for lobsters (depending, of course, on your point of view), OK for saxophones.
But it's a good idea to take the mouthpiece off first.
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
Messages
1,579
Boiling only works on old-school lacquer. Does nothing at all to modern lacquers. ONly chem strippers work on modern lacq, and indeed you have to land on the right one and do repeated applications (at least as a DIY'er).
But since OP found his info already, no point in elaborating on that much more.
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
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7,874
I have used "Aircraft Paint Remover" to remove newer epoxy lacquer several times. I don't know if it is available in the UK. It works, but it is messy and must be done outdoors with good rubber gloves. Even when it works the best you still have to manually remove lacquer from the "nooks and crannies".

I had always removed the lacquer and then gave the brass a brushed finish with my scotch abrasive wheels and pads. My apprentice refinished a YAS-23 and skipped the paint remover and went straight to the abrasive wheels and accomplished the same result in much less time.

Ferree's tools sells cans of Nikolas spray lacquer in both clear and gold tinted finishes, but as Jaye indicated these are used primarily for spot touch up jobs. A tip I learned when using Nikolas lacquer is to heat the can in hot water and use heated air to heat the part being sprayed. The lacquer seems to lay better when you do.

The abrasives I use are shown in the photo. The larger wheel is used in a bench motor, and the smaller wheels are Dremel attachments.

1580677189671.jpeg
 
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