SYOS

Sound Proofing a Room

AndyG

Member
Messages
326
Location
Derby
Having looked into this myself ( I have a really awkward neighbour), there doesn't appear to be an easy and affordable way to do this if its to be really effective.
The most effective way seems to be by creating a " floating room" inside a room ( if that makes any sense) which would involve all sorts of boarding and soundproofing on wall bars, same on ceilings and floors, and even then noise would escape from doors and windows.
To help eliminate some noise, seals around a closed door maybe an idea even if its just a blanket on the floor, however the sound will vibrate through walls and floors. For this reason Im going to convert a brick building in my garden into a soundproof studio...seems my best option but not cheap ( luckily I have friends in building trade).
Some other members here have tried saxmutes, but I dont know anything about these other than sometimes practising with a duster in the bell of the sax which isnt ideal for me ( and probably not my neighbour).
Hope this helps and maybe other members might have some ideas.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
22,004
Location
Just north of Munich
I also looked at this a while ago. And there's a thread somewhere about it, probably in the old forum. I found that bick is not a good sound insulator. Neither is concrete. There seem to be two options - build a soundproof room along the lines suggested by AndyG (and be very careful about ventilation!) or buy a soundpoofing 'bag' that surounds the whole sax, can't remember the name. The doown the bell mutes don't do a lot as most of the sound of the higher notes comes out of the tone holes, not the bell. Learning to play quietly made a big difference....
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
12,656
Location
McLean, Virginia
Well, brick and concrete aren't bad I think, but need to be quite thick. It's not often practical to add another layer of brick wall.

The room within a room is the best way to go, but failing that you can improve things with double/triple glazing or very thick single glazing and fitting heavier doors (e.g. a half hour firedoor) or adding a layer or two of plaster board to the existing door.

For ceilings and stud walls, adding extra layers of plasterboard will help a bit. If the ceiling is strong enough putting sand in between the ceiling and floor above will help. Make sure the ceiling and joists are strong enough.

See my article here:

http://mediamusicforum.com/home-soundproofing.html
 

AndyG

Member
Messages
326
Location
Derby
For ceilings and stud walls, adding extra layers of plasterboard will help a bit.
You can get acoustic platerboard for a similar price and ideally, sandwiched in between, a layer of special soundproofing sponge.
if its possible to remove existing plasterboard, put acoustic rock wool between the timbers and fit metal resilient bars accross the timbers and fix boards to these, hence vibrations shouldnt travel through the stud.
 
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nakedlunch

Member
Messages
98
Location
London
I live in a flat with people above and below me. What I have done is to practice in my shower cubicle (not whilst showering!). The cubicle is raised from the ground anyway and has re-inforced glass - just like any other cubicle. I then bought some chip board and cut it to size to place on top of the cubicle - thus making it completly enclosed. I stand in the cubicle and play from the music on the stand which is placed outside the cubicle. I have added a portable fan as it can get very stuffy otherwise. With all the doors and windows shut my wife says that she can hardly hear a thing in the next but one room or outside. My neighbour has also heard nothing. Has worked wonders for me but then I am lucky that my flat was designed this way.
I also bought a Lebayle sax mute for a £30 a few months back. Although not perfect it does an OK job.
 

Moz

Senior Member
Messages
841
Location
North of Liskeard, Cornwall,UK
Play on the moon because as we all know 'in space, no one can hear you play saxophone'.

I know, not helpful but a few vials of vino collapso will get me to say anything!

Martin

PS The best soundproofing that is also the cheapest is distance, play as far away as you can get from awkward neighbours. As has been said, the car is a good option.
 

Moz

Senior Member
Messages
841
Location
North of Liskeard, Cornwall,UK
e-sax is what I was thinking about for making things quieter. They're not cheap.
Ye Gods!! I just looked at the e-sax for tenor, £652 from sax.co.uk (other retailers are out there). That's horrifying, and how heavy is it with the sax in it and all? (Apologies to old git for using a comma before 'and').

Cheers

Martin -- who's garden is remote and who has neighbours who like the sax (I am a lucky man).
 

MandyH

Sax-Mad fiend!
Subscriber
Messages
3,413
Location
The Malverns, Worcs
When she bought her house, my sister found that one of the bedrooms had been lined with those papier mache / cardboard egg boxes. Apparently the grandson of the previous occupant had his drum kit in there. Whether it really helped cut down the noise to the neighbours, I have no idea.

Fortunately, we live in a detached house, and I can only practice between 9:00am and 9:00pm anyway.
 

Nick Cook

Member
Messages
862
Location
Wokingham, Berks, UK
I live in a flat with people above and below me. What I have done is to practice in my shower cubicle (not whilst showering!). The cubicle is raised from the ground anyway and has re-inforced glass - just like any other cubicle. I then bought some chip board and cut it to size to place on top of the cubicle - thus making it completly enclosed. I stand in the cubicle and play from the music on the stand which is placed outside the cubicle. I have added a portable fan as it can get very stuffy otherwise. With all the doors and windows shut my wife says that she can hardly hear a thing in the next but one room or outside. My neighbour has also heard nothing. Has worked wonders for me but then I am lucky that my flat was designed this way.
I also bought a Lebayle sax mute for a £30 a few months back. Although not perfect it does an OK job.
:))):))):))):))):)))
 

Sunray

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,726
Location
Norfolk, UK
I have got to tell you guys ...

I laughed myself silly at the thought of hundreds or even thousands of Saxplayers all over the world playing their horn in their Car, the Shower, A Broom Cupboard and Oh! the imagination has no bounds ... :))) :))) :)))
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
22,004
Location
Just north of Munich
Just watched a documentary of the Vienna Philharmonic on tour in Japan. There was a shot of a horn player practicing - on his bed with with his horn under his duvet..... Just as well it wasn't a trombone, would have looked very strange. :)))
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Just watched a documentary of the Vienna Philharmonic on tour in Japan. There was a shot of a horn player practicing - on his bed with with his horn under his duvet..... Just as well it wasn't a trombone, would have looked very strange. :)))
Puts on pedant's hat and:-

Really Kev, it would be almost impossible to tell visually what he was playing under the duvet, unless it was a slide trombone.

Wanders off muttering about declining standards, this is what you get when you charge fees at universities etc, etc mumble and so into the distant hills.....fade out.



Sorry , it's the Clint Eastwood season on ITV4.
 
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