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Saxophones Sopranos- Curved & Straight.....

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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As I have said elsewhere, the man who invented the sax ,only made straight ones, he should have known what he was doing.
Are you sure? All the references I've seen said that the first saxes were in the shape of an Ophicleide, which is far from straight. Or are you only talking about the sopranos? But what's to stop someone improving on Sax's designs - as happened in many ways - for instance the invention of the automatic octave mechanism.
 

visionari1

Senior Member
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1,595
Pete Thomas said:
I believe the angle from your mouth should be the same as the angle from an alto or tenor neck, ie very close to perpendicular to your face, maybe very slightly down.

It should not (IMO) be as pointing down as a clarinet embouchure.

This means that a curved neck means you don't have to either hold the sop out so straight (possible quite tiring) or else play with your head pointing down.
Hmmm Pete…

I have a straight sop with curved neck piece and that's how I play (like a clarinet position) This might also explain my arm/ shoulder pains. When seated I rest the sax on my knee taking weight of the hands and neck.
Yes my alto playing position is very different to the soprano.
Thanks for the tip, will look into it.
Cheers
Jimu
 

MellowD

Lost In Theory
Messages
544
a bit easier ergonomically.

On another Issue. I have a touch of arthritis developing in my right shoulder which is only a problem when i attempt Soprano for any amount of time.


Guess what? I`ve been thinking about going curvy ,but reckon The intonation probs would Nip my head.

Okay this is a subject I'm very keen to hear more on. I have arthritis in my neck. I'm fine playing my Yani Tenor. I'm just about to purchase a Soprano and looking at my options.

For the painful neck scenario, did you ever make a choice on the straight or curvy for that?

What are anyone's experiences to help me on this aspect please?

Mel
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,227
Curvy is more comfortable to play - also prettier and intonation is not a problem. Just get a really good mouthpiece - preferably custom made! Get a Bauhaus Walstein - one of the best at a reasonable price.

Kind regards
Tom
 

jazzdoh

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,231
It has to be curved for me,due to a bad back,straight sops are uncomfortable for me to play.
I have the Yani sc901b,had it new many years ago,not found any other sops that i would swop it with but have thought about trying the Yani sc991 neck which seems to have a more curved angle,(did try one once in Sax.co in London but not on my sax).

I have noticed the palm keys are better if i tip the sax up.

Brian
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
Cafe Moderator
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12,124
Okay this is a subject I'm very keen to hear more on. I have arthritis in my neck. I'm fine playing my Yani Tenor. I'm just about to purchase a Soprano and looking at my options.

For the painful neck scenario, did you ever make a choice on the straight or curvy for that?

What are anyone's experiences to help me on this aspect please?

Mel
Curved or curved-neck should be more comfortable. A good sling helps.

Yani make three different curved necks, so you can choose your position.
Actually two of them are supposed to be for straight soprano, the third one is for curved. They can be swapped. Back in the old days they had a different curve, half way between the curved for the straight and the curved for the curved. :)confused:).

I think that BW can take Yani necks. At least JP can.
 

Sue

If at first you don't succeed try try try a Gin
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I vote curved. I have a recurring shoulder problem (rotator cuff) and found the curved to be more comfortable.
 

BigMartin

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3,886
I vote curved. I have a recurring shoulder problem (rotator cuff) and found the curved to be more comfortable.
But for a neck problem, I would have thought a straight would be better. More weight on the arm, less on the neck. In fact, I'm not sure I take any of the weight of my (straight) sop on my neck. The strap mainly seems to be there to stop me dropping the thing. Am I doing something wrong?

Anyway, if you can play a tenor with a necksrap rather than a harness, I doubt that either kind of sop would be a problem.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
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21,999
But for a neck problem, I would have thought a straight would be better. More weight on the arm, less on the neck. In fact, I'm not sure I take any of the weight of my (straight) sop on my neck. The strap mainly seems to be there to stop me dropping the thing. Am I doing something wrong?

Anyway, if you can play a tenor with a necksrap rather than a harness, I doubt that either kind of sop would be a problem.
A lot of the weight of the arms is taken by the neck, so with a straight sop and your arms sticking out in front, it's more strain than a curvy with arms on chest.
 
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