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Tone Soprano tone

Mack

Senior Member
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I've been looking on YouTube for soprano players to learn from, and I've noticed how many players have that hard edged sound like Coltrane, Lacy etc. Some like Wayne Shorter and Branford Marsalis seem able to "back off" and use subtone to get a thicker, more complex sound when they want it, but this kind of playing seems quite rare. Why? Can anyone suggest players who take the opposite approach to Coltrane and Co?
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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My favourite's Sydney Bechet. Closely foloowed by Artie Shaw

One guy with a really smooth tone is Kenny G. (Waits for the jeers).
 

daveysaxboy

::::
::::
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3,303
My favourite's Sydney Bechet. Closely foloowed by Artie Shaw

One guy with a really smooth tone is Kenny G. (Waits for the jeers).

Only silly people would jeer Kenny G. The biggest selling smooth jazz player, great chops, very rich. Some folk might not like his style but respect has to be giving in my book. Any person who puts there all into there playing should get nothing but respect. I always kind of think a lot people who knock him have no clue about music.
 

Colin the Bear

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Burnley bb9 9dn
I think it's his hair. Same thing happened to michael bolton. I haven't bought any of the G man's recordings but if he was playing local I'd go have a look see.

Of course just lately I've been quite impressed with our own Davey on sop.
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
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I've been looking on YouTube for soprano players to learn from, and I've noticed how many players have that hard edged sound like Coltrane, Lacy etc. Some like Wayne Shorter and Branford Marsalis seem able to "back off" and use subtone to get a thicker, more complex sound when they want it, but this kind of playing seems quite rare. Why? Can anyone suggest players who take the opposite approach to Coltrane and Co?

I cannot consider Coltrane and Lacy similar, but I understand that they both have an edgy sound.
If you think that not many soprano players were around before them, it is quite understandable the influence they have.
About Lacy, the recordings with Gil Evans have a sound that I would consider thicker and complex.
Shorter is in a different dimension: I took years to start appreciating his soprano playing.

Also, using a large tip (like WS or SL) does not help controlling that potentially out of tune horn.

I remember some Lucky Thompson recordings on soprano that exhibit quite a unique sound.

In the last century I recorded this album, mostly on soprano.
http://www.aldevis.com/refuso.html

Recent stuff (testing mouthpieces or promoting instruments):
S
www.aldevis.com/sequoia/wellyouneed1.mp3
www.aldevis.com/sequoia/wellyouneed2.mp3
SAT
www.aldevis.com/sequoia/three_sequoias.mp3

http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?200435-Absolute-soprano-mouthpieces

And something childish:
https://soundcloud.com/aldevis/bloodybladda
 
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Colin the Bear

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Burnley bb9 9dn
Never heard of Lucky Thompson before. What a powerful but gentle sweet sound.

And how remiss, when talking about soprano, to not mention our own Aldevis Tibaldi. A major inspiration for any sop player.

http://youtu.be/uloEZ5V8qF8
 

Ads

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I`d live to have heard more of that ! .. nice playing Aldevis !
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
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Andy Sheppard and Wayne Shorter do it for me Mack. They both have a lot of soul in their playing.
Plenty of space and room to breathe.
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
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Soprano has often been seen just as a doubling horn, but Cannonball Adderley and Johnny Hodges had quite a distinctive approach too. worth looking for those tracks.
 
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