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Saxophones Sop Questions

McSax

New Member
Messages
13
I've been looking at budget sops, and I have a few questions, any advice would really be appreciated.

The John Packer range seem to be getting good reviews from others - are they decent and playable despite the low price? Is there a major difference (except shape, obviously!) between straight and curved, I prefer the look of the curved ones, but I'm not sure if there are any drawbacks as most sops are straight. Finally, the JP range come in lots of different finishes, at different prices. Is there a difference in tone, or is it just a visual thing?

I play alto and clarinet, so I'm hoping that I'll be able to sort out my embersure fairly quickly for it.
 

Pyrografix

Senile Member
Messages
1,026
I have a curvy JP sop - it sounds good, plays well throughout the range, not difficult to play in tune and looks really cute! So definitely worth the money.

You'll get lots of comments about which sounds better - curvy or straight. The finishes in this range I think are purely cosmetic. Its worth keeping your eye on the JP website for ex-demo models as well.

Cheers,

Amanda
 

baritonesax

Member
Messages
256
I have an "antique finish" JP straight sop and it's very good. It's not as nicely made as my Yanagisawa straight, but it's as nice to play - bigger toned, but not as sweet-sounding as the Yani.

If the finish makes a difference to the tone, it will be very very marginal.
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,488
I Love my BW curvy and the JP's seem to be good too (some folks insist that they are closely related and it might very well be the case) . I prefer curved sopranos. I get lots of compliments for volume and quality of sound (most people expect a toy trumpet sound to come out from this horn! ;} you will surprise them!)
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
For £300 - £400 the JP range is exceptional value. I own a JP/Smith Watkins Cornet and 2 JP/Rath trombones, which are all excellent quality for little money. With BW now costing twice the price I would be happy with a JP.

I play a BW Bronze Straight and a BW Bronze Curvy, and prefer the sound of the curvy, find it easier to hold comfortably, and prefer the position it is held in. If a Curvy is good enough for Jan Garbarek then it is good enough for me also.

Kind regards
Tom
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,488
yes, now the sole other question remains: is the Garbarek sound depending on his incredible ability or on his different make saxophone ?(or both these things) And how do we relate and compare (in terms of ability and inherent saxophone sound ) to Jan Garbarek and his horn.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
According to Joe Giardullo it is partly due to his very fast, focussed air stream, the warm curved soprano sound and a small bright mouthpiece.

My comment, as you might gather, was just about the viability of a curved soprano as lots of pro players seem to use a straight soprano.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Twas what I thought........................:shocked::w00t:;}

I thought it would also be useful to answer it for others benefit!
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
I'm sure it's down to nothing else than his sax

Made by the obscure Italian intrument builder A Santoni of Parè. >:)
 

Gallen

Senior Member
Messages
397
Can't comment on the straight/curved thing - I own a curved jp sop, and my teacher comments that it works great for the price, and he sounds awesome on it. I'm currently using a Yamaha 5C till I find the time to properly audition more mpcs - the stock mouthpiece that arrived with my JP sop is quite bad for the low notes (warbling).
 

Gandalfe

Member
Messages
107
The curved SOP usually sounds different to the musician, not the audience. My wife prefers playing the curvy. I prefer the straight but the curvy generates more audience attention. I'd use the curvy more if I had a better sax stand solution. I've tried many but really do prefer the straight sop stand as part of a alto/tenor and clarinet setup.

When it comes to finding the voicing I really want with a new instrument, I do long tones (soft to loud and back to soft over 8 beats, then move to next note) for ten minutes or so per practice for a month. I also have been known to try up to three or four mouthpieces until I find the one that I like. I usually can't determine what mouthpiece I prefer in one setting. It is a labor of luv, so enjoy the time spent searching for your sound. :O)
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,909
I uploaded two sound clips with straight sopranos and curved sopranos. All saxes are American sopranos from the 20's. The samples are from SJ Masterclass CD "Great Horns Of America" by Bob Ackerman. Bob Ackerman is blowing an old New York Woodwind ss mpc. Bob Hanlon is blowing a modern Berg Larsen HR ss mpc.

First clip: Beuscher (BA) tip bell with slightly bent neck and after that Martin (BH) straight. Martin is brighter?

Second clip: Beuscher (BA) curved and Conn (BH) curved.

http://s297.photobucket.com/albums/mm201/thomsax/?action=view&current=ssvscs.mp4

When I compared the tone/sound I can hear a difference between straight and and curved sopranos. I think the curved is more mellow and rounder. But the biggest differences is between the straight Beuscher and the straight Martin!!!

Thomas
 
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