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[Solved] Mechanical Damage to Tenor Sax Octave Key, Missing Screw, Hinge Rod Loose

saxophool

New Member
Messages
7
Hi Guys,

I've found some pretty serious damage on my tenor sax. I'm wondering if you guys know how I can fix it myself, or at least give me an indication of how the damage occurred/how much it'll cost to fix.

I've had my Trevor James Classic II tenor sax for five months now. I'd like to think I've been taking good care of it; putting it back in the case when I'm done with it, and very occasionally letting it rest on my bed while I take mid-practice breaks.

Yesterday when I used the octave key, it got stuck so I couldn't play low notes. I took a look and it wasn't closing when I depressed the octave key. It seems a screw has came loose and dropped out, detaching one of the hinge rods from one end, and the spring on the octave key is dislocated.

Pic 1 - Octave key Spring
Pic 2 - Octave key spring
Pic 3 - Octave key spring
Pic 4 - Missing screw
Pic 5 - Missing screw

I'd really appreciate it if anybody has any advice. :)
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
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12,483
Location
Burnley bb9 9dn
Doesn't look serious. I don't think you've lost a screw. The rod has backed off. It has a screw thread on the other end. It goes all the way through the tube and locates in the hole. Be gentle as you relocate it and don't damage the thread. Don't over tighten it. When it's secure gently relocate the spring. 2 mins job.
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
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7,171
Location
Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
Colin nailed it. I didn't take the time to look at the pictures. :oops: The thumb octave lever on most saxes is held in place by two pivot screws. Apparently the Trevor James is different.
 

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
Subscriber
Messages
3,391
Location
manchester
Doesn't look serious. I don't think you've lost a screw. The rod has backed off. It has a screw thread on the other end. It goes all the way through the tube and locates in the hole. Be gentle as you relocate it and don't damage the thread. Don't over tighten it. When it's secure gently relocate the spring. 2 mins job.
Well spotted Colin
 
OP
S

saxophool

New Member
Messages
7
Hi guys,

I'm overwhelmed by the responses here. I feel as if I ought to pay for service this good. :D I really appreciate all the advice.

It's a relief to hear that the damage is easily fixed. I'll very carefully give it a shot tomorrow.
 

Jeanette

Organizress
Cafe Moderator
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24,708
Location
Cheshire UK
Buy a stand for the sax, better than laying it on the bed and it can be left there after playing to dry out, if you are worried about dust just find a cover for it :)

Jx
 

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
Subscriber
Messages
3,391
Location
manchester
Hi guys,

I'm overwhelmed by the responses here. I feel as if I ought to pay for service this good. :D I really appreciate all the advice.

It's a relief to hear that the damage is easily fixed. I'll very carefully give it a shot tomorrow.
make sure you have a good small slotted screwdriver with a good end as it needs to go into the post with the rod as your screwing it in

ps the HAYNES SAXOPHONE MANUAL is must for beginners, it will familiarise you with your sax and the problems that can occur, I think they are about £15 and great value for money
 
Last edited:

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,642
Location
Betelgeuse
make sure you have a good small slotted screwdriver with a good end as it needs to go into the post with the rod as your screwing it in

ps the HAYNES SAXOPHONE MANUAL is must for beginners, it will familiarise you with your sax and the problems that can occur, I think they are about £15 and great value for money
Agreed on both. Get a reasonable quality set of precision screwdrivers. They're readily available. There are several different sizes of screws on any given sax.
 
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saxophool

New Member
Messages
7
Hi guys,

Just letting you all know I fixed it using all of the advice above. I'd like to think I have a wide variety of strange and unusual screwdriver bits in my collection but none for the pivot screw on my sax, so I had to make do with a kitchen knife. :cool:

Thanks again for all of your help; I really appreciate it.
 

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
Subscriber
Messages
3,391
Location
manchester
A lot of repair techs like the Wiha sets. They are a bit more money, but are made of German steel and built to last.
I think the use of small screwdrivers with a long shaft can be very helpful in sax repair and they are quite difficult to find
 
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