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So what's first?

What

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Pittsburgh P.A.
Well my C Mel came in today. So much to do. All the keys work, though some of the action is loose. It needs a total pad replacement. The neck does not pull out, but it does spin freely when seated. I plan to replace all the screws and springs, provided I can find thread matches and the right springs for an 1916 or C Mel from Martin. The entire sax needs to be polished up. Finally the case looks great, but it does need a new handle and it smells funny(can I air it out or can I use a spray to help it out.

I am not sure what step one should be. Also any suggestions on the best bang for my buck as far as new pads and maintenance tools?
 

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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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Just north of Munich
Don't replace anything you don't need to.

Screwdrivers, pad slicks/pricker, leak light, possibly swedging tools, possibly spring pliers are all the tools you need. And a little spirit lamp or low power gas torch.

Measure cups with a vernier before ordering pads. Make sure you check pad thickness as well.

If the neck fit isn't right, get it done professionally. This can't be done without special tools.

music medic/ferees tools for bits in the US. Music medic do a starter kit, afik.
 

MellowD

Lost In Theory
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Sturton by Stow, Lincoln
Unable to help with the technical side, however, I can say that a proper airing of the case out would be a very fine option as a first if you can spare it the time.

I do mean leaving it open and somewhere dry and warm for some time so that any moulds can be dried out and desiccated, perhaps weeks, or in excess of a month, however long it needs. If this is difficult, then put it somewhere warm and dry, with a pot of salt without a lid in the case, so that the salt will absorb any moistures (not with sax inside of course). Change the salt frequently as it becomes wet itself. Or purchase some of those crystals which are supposed to be used to absorb condensation in secondary glazed windows or where tumble dryers are used, and use those. Salt is cheaper and we usually already have it in the kitchen.

Smells of this nature are often predominantly indicative of long term storage in damp conditions where moulds have been able to thrive. Personally, I wouldn't wish to be breathing these spores and moulds in when playing my sax to let them get into my lungs!

When you feel it has dried out enough, then give the case a really good vacuum out to remove those nasty spores and prevent anything starting up again.

Using a can is an option, of course, however I would suggest that this will still leave an underlying problem in your case which will ultimately be unhealthy for you as well as your sax.

Since you have said there's a lot of repairs to restore this little gem, then I guess you have the time to offer the same consideration to the case? If only for your own health sake (alongside the offending pong).

Hope this helps.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
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Burnley bb9 9dn
Good title for the thread. What's first...yes it is.

I'd be careful about polishing it. Do a little research. That age old patina can't be replaced. You can polish the value off an antique.

After airing the case, leave some sodium bicarbonate in it to absorb smells. Works with the fridge too by the way.
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What

Member
Messages
314
Locality
Pittsburgh P.A.
Don't replace anything you don't need to.

Screwdrivers, pad slicks/pricker, leak light, possibly swedging tools, possibly spring pliers are all the tools you need. And a little spirit lamp or low power gas torch.

Measure cups with a vernier before ordering pads. Make sure you check pad thickness as well.

If the neck fit isn't right, get it done professionally. This can't be done without special tools.

music medic/ferees tools for bits in the US. Music medic do a starter kit, afik.

I did see their site up when I hunted a bit, but the price of the kits made me wonder about the site. That's a lot of stuff for a really good price.

Mellow, your right about the case. Sadly winter is rolling in here so warm and dry might be a bit of a challenge, but the salt pots might not be a bad idea. Like putting a wet cellphone in a bag of rice(remove phone before serving rice).
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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Minster On Sea
I'd just hang it on the wall as it is - without all the farting about with springs and stuff.
 

jbtsax

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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
What's first. Find an experienced repair tech in your area to serve as your back up when you get stuck on some part of the project, because you will. :)
 

What

Member
Messages
314
Locality
Pittsburgh P.A.
What's first. Find an experienced repair tech in your area to serve as your back up when you get stuck on some part of the project, because you will. :)

There is a great local place I will be getting a ride too in a few weeks. I plan to have them take a look at both saxes(my big brass tenor and the little old C Mel). I will need their help on the neck, and they probably will have some good advice on what it will take to make the old man play again. I am going to have to fight the urge to start until then.
 

Kingsleyhk

Senior Member
Messages
507
Locality
Nr. Bandung, Indonesia
Just received the saxophone repair kit from MusicMedic (about to move to a country where I don't anticipate finding a technician will be easy!). Most impressed - very comprehensive - pads, corks, etc and good quality tools - pliers and things plus a leaklight - in a nice wooden box. Not cheap but I think at US$95 good value.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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Just north of Munich
best if you can measure diameter from the cups. Old US saxes have imperial cups, but pads are all in mm now. So order exact or fractionally down. But not up.
 

griff136

Well-Known Member
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1,056
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I live in Exmouth Devon.
Seeing as Martin saxes have soldered tone holes, my first step would be to check that the solder has not corroded and is causing leaks between the tonehole and the body tube.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Café Supporter
Messages
21,912
Locality
Just north of Munich
Seeing as Martin saxes have soldered tone holes, my first step would be to check that the solder has not corroded and is causing leaks between the tonehole and the body tube.

Oops. I thought it was a Conn. Ignore my comments about locking screws.
 

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