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Saxophones Setup for Yani 992 Soprano

jazzadoni

New Member
Messages
10
Hello all,

Could I get some advise from anyone who plays the Yani 992 soprano? What's a good setup for it as far as the mouthpiece choice and ligature are concerned? I just scored a sweet deal on a used one and I need to make full use of it.

Thanks,
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Contact Joe Giardullo at Soprano Planet and discuss what your mouthpiece & sound needs are in some detail - he is awesome and really great to work with, he will design a custom mouthpiece that will fit the bill: Best Mouthpieces for Soprano Saxophone- SOPRANOPLANET - These questions are very subjective and any guidance is also likely to be highly subjective. I play Bauhaus Walstein Bronze sopranos which are supposedly Yani 992 copies, but choosing what sound you want to produce is too subjective to narrow down to a particular set up in my humble opinion.

Kind regards
Tom
 
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rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,379
I never knew that. I know the M2 that I had was a lovely instrument!
I think that the M2 horns aren't Yani copies, certainly the alto and tenor are not. But other BW saxes are based on Yani.

Back to the OP. I have got a Yanagisawa SC991 and find that lots of different mouthpieces work well on it. My favourites include Drake Son of Slant and Berg Larsen, but other pieces that sound great on it are Selmer (old HR), Meyer, Pillinger, Vandoren V16, SR Tech.

Rhys
 

BeBopSop

Member
Messages
274
Hello all,

Could I get some advise from anyone who plays the Yani 992 soprano? What's a good setup for it as far as the mouthpiece choice and ligature are concerned? I just scored a sweet deal on a used one and I need to make full use of it.

Thanks,
Yamaha 4C and a Rovner lig. This set up will enable you to play over the whole of the instrument,with a decent responsive tone. Yes the mp is only £25.00 but dont get put off by that it works well!
 

jazzadoni

New Member
Messages
10
Hello Tom,

I will get in touch with him. I purchase the horn with a metal yani #5. the low F, E, and E flat notes keep bouncing when I'm practicing with it. The stock plastic mouth piece the horn came in with does not do that much. It may be bad technique on my part though.

Thank you,
 

jazzadoni

New Member
Messages
10
Yamaha 4C and a Rovner lig. This set up will enable you to play over the whole of the instrument,with a decent responsive tone. Yes the mp is only £25.00 but dont get put off by that it works well!
Thanks John,

I will try it to see if the 4C is better than the stock Yani piece.
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,483
well, I play the BW bronze curved copy of the Yanagisawa, I love the sound of the Ponzol Vintage Hr 70 with its original ligature ( in this case rovner-like ligs do have a different response)........very “ round” , if that’s what you are looking for in a soprano (I do!)
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Joe at Soprano Planet could reface/rebalance your Yani mpc - charges $175 in total. They are well made but rather dull.

As well as the Ponzol Vintage above I would recommend a Vandoren V16 and the Morgan Vintage soprano - all cost about $100 and sound good on my BW sopranos:

http://www.morganmouthpieces.com/soprano/vintage.html

The prices at Sax-cessories are very competitive: http://www.sax-ccessories.com/category/3/SOPRANO_SAX
 
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Wade Cornell

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
2,146
I'd reinforce Toms vote for a Morgan vintage. I have several Yanis and they work well on everything. They are on the mellow side with a nice round tone and somewhat versitile. Very playable and not stuffy. Most other cheap mouthpieces are rather dull. The only inexpensive brighter pieces are Bari and Lakey. Both of these can sound good, but are much more difficult to control (in my experience).
 

curlybob

Member
Messages
47
Hello all,

Could I get some advise from anyone who plays the Yani 992 soprano? What's a good setup for it as far as the mouthpiece choice and ligature are concerned? I just scored a sweet deal on a used one and I need to make full use of it.

Thanks,
I've played several 992 sops and loads of readily available mouthpieces work great with them; yanagisawa hard rubber and metal, selmer S80 (D or E usually about right) and the vandoren V16 probably S6 is a good starting point. If you want something a little more "boutique" Morgan Fry does 2 cracking sop mouthpieces and is a great guy to deal with (I've got one) or try Ed Pillinger he does beautiful custom mouthpieces for not much more than "off the shelf" pieces - brilliant craftsman and has done fantastic work on my selmer ss soloists. Try as many pieces as you can!
 

curlybob

Member
Messages
47
The M2s aren't yanagisawa copies and are made in Tawain and are quite a different design to the chinese models which are complete yanagisawa "replicas". I've played the BW bronzes side by side with Yanagisawa 992s and they are scarily close!
 

Wade Cornell

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
2,146
Curlybob's reply would be about rather expensive mouthpieces compared to the ones already mentioned. I guess since you have a 992 maybe he's presuming that you've got lots of $$ to spend? You haven't mentioned the sound you want or your level of experience/playing. I think some of us presumed that you are somewhat new to sax, which might not be the case. If still learning you should probably stick to some of the less expensive but good mouthpieces already mentioned. If experienced and have lots of $$ to throw it's hard to beat a Lamberson F Maj 7 if you like your tone mid-bright. Tip openings are a matter of preference, but large tips are not recommended unless you already have a strong embouchure and lots of long tone experience to give control. Getting your chops together with a cheaper mouthpiece (lots already mentioned) would be a good starting point. If you are well experienced, but new to sop, then you may be able to jump to a better mouthpiece after half a year. If a beginner, you might be best off getting your chops together with a smaller tip, softer reeds and working your way up in reed strength until you are ready to change up. Large tip pieces have heaps of flexibility (generally) but are harder to control and are likely to frustrate a beginner and retard progress. Developing an even tone and having good intonation is hard enough and requires a lot of practice. Giving yourself extra hurdles by taking on an unnecessarily expensive (more advanced) mouthpiece that's more difficult to play is not necessarily a good move and can frustrate. Once again, if you have heaps of $$ to throw you could order a beginner piece to be custom made. However you’d also be likely to be moving up from that piece in the future. Your call, and your $$.
 

Jazzaferri

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,667
Contact Joe Giardullo at Soprano Planet and discuss what your mouthpiece & sound needs are in some detail - he is awesome and really great to work with, he will design a custom mouthpiece that will fit the bill: http://sopranoplanet.com/ These questions are very subjective and any guidance is also likely to be highly subjective. I play Bauhaus Walstein Bronze sopranos which are supposedly Yani 992 copies, but choosing what sound you want to produce is too subjective to narrow down to a particular set up in my humble opinion. http://sopranoplanet.com/2010 THOUGHTS.htm

Kind regards
Tom

Plus one for SopranoPlanet. Joe will work with you beforehand to get an idea of the sound you want and your playing level. He then does the work.

If you aren't happy with it he will work with you til you are and maybe beyond that if you cant get happy with it for some reason. AS little as a .001 inch difference in the baffle or throat can make a noticeable difference in performance with sop mpces.

I know of no one in the business who understands them as well as Joe.

I am not a paid informant or anything, just a satisfied customer.
 
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