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M/Pieces - Ligs setup changes

allansto

Senior Member
Messages
471
Hi guys I havent been on for a while but I havent had a decent question to ask for a while
When you`re playing a gig or practising and you need a different sound for some songs as opposed to others,
do you have say two or three mouth peices set up with different types of reeds in to allow for a quick change,
so you can facilitate the change in jonre and sound. eg rock to jazz etc.
Allansto:D
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,391
No, absolutely not. That way lies madness !

Work out what music you really love (not just like), and what sound you want. Get a flexible set-up that lets you get your sound, so nothing too extreme in the way of very high baffle, or dark, classical piece. Then work on your sound and work on flexibility with that basic sound.

With a good basic sound you should be flexible enough to get a pretty raucous rock sound, a lovely ballad sound and all points between.

Remember that quite a few of the more extreme sax sounds you hear on recordings or live will depend on electronic effects. Even the person playing doesn't sound like that without being processed artificially. If you want to sound like that, then get some effects too.

Rhys

PS Having different saxes on a gig, say soprano and tenor, can help you get different sounds for different songs.
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,125
[...] Get a flexible set-up that lets you get your sound, so nothing too extreme in the way of very high baffle, or dark, classical piece. Then work on your sound and work on flexibility with that basic sound.

With a good basic sound you should be flexible enough to get a pretty raucous rock sound, a lovely ballad sound and all points between.
Flexibility is the word. It needs to be practiced too.
I use the "Tom Sawyer" technique: I try to imitate the expression of the player I want to sound like. Based on approximate and often wrong assumptions, it works for me.

A first exercise is to take an easy bluesy lick and try to play it like Webster, Trane or Brecker (or whoever you like)
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,096
As well as saxophone heroes, I have singers I try to emmulate. Probably a total fail but it gives me something to aim at.

With a sop, alto, tenor, and bari to bang away on and a clarinet to sound posh on, I think that should cover it.

I think we are always looking for a better mouthpiece but untill we find it, the one we're playing is the best one and we hang on to it.
 

Justin Chune

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,023
I went to a recital by altoist Susan Mackenzie and she changed mouthpieces to suit straight stuff or Jazz. First time I'd ever seen that done.

Susan didn't have a soprano and a friend of mine loaned her his, but only for the afternoon. She played it like she had been born with it. I don't know how the pros do what they do.

Jim.
 

Kingsleyhk

Senior Member
Messages
508
I think that, unless you're really at the extremes of mouthpieces (lay/openings), then you should be able to adapt sufficiently. Changing during a gig is very iffy.

I have done it but no more. Mind you, I do always carry two usable mouthpieces after dropping my Dukoff on a tiled floor while setting up and having to watch the gig from the sidelines!
 
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