Scariest repair procedure

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
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So, while in Italy, I borrowed this tenor (twin of my own) and the case strap broke, falling for about one meter (1 yard and 4 inches, or 1/1800 of a nautical mile) bending the horn.

Left hand did not move: slight banana bend affecting the whole horn

Went to repairer/maker/owner of the horn (Roberto Buttus)
He put some solid steel bit in the neck receiver, with a heavy bar attached to it, and gave ONE SINGLE HEAVY HIT on the horn, against an anvil

"Now it works"
And it worked

(he also confessed that every time it's really scary for him too)
 

ellinas

Senior Member
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Athens, Greece
Happened to my beaugnier alto. Case fell and body slightly bent. Fixed very quickly.
The stupidest effect is that I still feel it plays so much better after it got fixed .... brrrrrr
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
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So, while in Italy, I borrowed this tenor (twin of my own) and the case strap broke, falling for about one meter (1 yard and 4 inches, or 1/1800 of a nautical mile) bending the horn.
It might have been alright if the metre had been taken as 1 yard and 3 inches, as you know it's the extra inch that makes all the difference.
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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Minster On Sea
Mr Noble did the same thing to my Keilwerth alto about 19 years ago, shortly after I bought it and dumped it on the floor a couple of times. He used a snug fitting broom handle. Scary stuff. It's been fine ever since.
 

jbtsax

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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
@Stephen Howard Neat tool.

I was taught a similar technique to straighten slightly bent flute bodies. You place a long steel rod inside the flute that is slightly smaller than the diameter of the inside of the flute. Then the rod is given a violent slam against a hard steel object. The resulting vibration of the steel rod "shocks" the metal of the flute making it straight again. Yelling "HY-YAH" as you do so is optional. ;)
 

Stephen Howard

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@Stephen Howard Neat tool.

I was taught a similar technique to straighten slightly bent flute bodies. You place a long steel rod inside the flute that is slightly smaller than the diameter of the inside of the flute. Then the rod is given a violent slam against a hard steel object. The resulting vibration of the steel rod "shocks" the metal of the flute making it straight again. Yelling "HY-YAH" as you do so is optional. ;)
I've never tried it on a flute body - I usually go for sliding the body off a snug bar with the pressure applied in the appropriate direction.
I'll certainly give it a go - I've got plenty of scrap flutes and a few undersized old mandrels.
And although it sounds like quite a brutal technique, it's probably a lot less risky than the old bar pull method.
 
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