support Tone without tears Beginners' impro Patterns & exercises

Removing chrome from the keys

Jamesmac

Senior Member
Messages
1,744
Any solutions out there that will cause chrome to flake. Using a fine steel wool at the moment, with a lot of elbow grease. But very time consuming. Thanks.:)
PS. The new Nitromors don't work
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Think your going to be struggling short of grinding it off, but if you strip it and have them re-chromed surely this will swallow up anything that's left?
 
Any solutions out there that will cause chrome to flake. Using a fine steel wool at the moment, with a lot of elbow grease. But very time consuming. Thanks.:)
PS. The new Nitromors don't work

Most saxophone keys on student models are nicked plated, not chrome. I have had good success using Caswell's B-929 Nickel Stripper. The photo below is a work in progress in which YAS-23 keys were stripped and given a brushed satin finish. I'll post a few more photos when the "experimental" project is finished.

 
as previously said the “ chrome” is generally nickel on saxophones.

One can reverse plate items that are plated, the process involves, .like the original plating, immersion in a solution of water and an acid plus the use of electrodes, this, despite the intervention of acid, is probably less invasive than buffing all that metal off the keys and you will see how it comes off in minutes.

Make sure to immerse the keys in a neutralising solution post treatment (perhaps containing some Sodium Carbonate to neutralise any acid still active)
 
as previously said the “ chrome” is generally nickel on saxophones.

One can reverse plate items that are plated, the process involves, .like the original plating, immersion in a solution of water and an acid plus the use of electrodes, this, despite the intervention of acid, is probably less invasive than buffing all that metal off the keys and you will see how it comes off in minutes.

Make sure to immerse the keys in a neutralising solution post treatment (perhaps containing some Sodium Carbonate to neutralise any acid still active)

Thanks Andre, but the thought of electricity and water.:shocked:
 
Thanks Andre, but the thought of electricity and water.:shocked:

Don't worry about the electricity. You would need only about 3 volts DC, supplied by a couple of ordinary cells, or for a quicker result use a car battery. I think the key to be stripped would have to be the positive electrode and use perhaps a piece of copper for the negative. I think vinegar might serve as the solution, but dilute battery acid (sulphuric) could be better, but rather more nasty. If I have the polarities the wrong way round you would see copper being deposited on the key. I have to say I haven't actually tried this but in theory it should work. I would try it on some other Nickel plated object first.
Whatever method you use I'd be interested to know the result.
Best of luck
O.C.V.
I don't know how it would compare with the result using the Nickel stripper which I would imagine to be pretty toxic.
 
Further thoughts.
On thinking about it the key would be the negative. Also it would be advisable to coat all non-plated surfaces with molten wax or similar to prevent erosion there, and watch the process very carefully as when the nickel has gone the brass itself would be attacked. Altogether I seem to be making a case for not using this method, but it just got me interested.
Good luck
O.C.V.
 
Hi, I nickel and zinc plate parts for the car all the time and buy supplies from these chaps who sell an acid pickle that will do the job. Basically it's some crystals you dissolve in water then dip whatever it is your doing in it, you do get some fumes and need gloves and eye protection is recommended but it works a treat.

http://www.gaterosplating.co.uk/Acid-Pickle.php
 
Most saxophone keys on student models are nicked plated, not chrome. I have had good success using Caswell's B-929 Nickel Stripper. The photo below is a work in progress in which YAS-23 keys were stripped and given a brushed satin finish. I'll post a few more photos when the "experimental" project is finished.

Are you planning to apply another protective finish to stop it discoloring, like wax for instance?

:confused:
 
Most saxophone keys on student models are nicked plated, not chrome. I have had good success using Caswell's B-929 Nickel Stripper. The photo below is a work in progress in which YAS-23 keys were stripped and given a brushed satin finish. I'll post a few more photos when the "experimental" project is finished.

if you dont mind, can you tell me how you make that satin finish?
and would it remain satin if you plated it (silver or nickel)?
 
if you dont mind, can you tell me how you make that satin finish?
and would it remain satin if you plated it (silver or nickel)?
These are the products I use. The large wheel is mounted in a bench motor on a spindle. Plating would not change the "brushed" finish. I experimented with silver plating a key that had that finish and I was disappointed with how it looked. The way the light reflected made it look kind of dirty. It didn't look at all as nice as the silver plated bead blasted finish found on many vintage instruments.

Brass finishing supplies.jpg
 
Last edited:

Similar threads... or are they? Maybe not but they could be worth reading anyway 😀

Support Cafesaxophone

Tutorials CDs PPT mouthpieces

Forum statistics

Topics
29,157
Messages
504,215
Members
8,545
Latest member
Miraven
Back
Top Bottom