All profit supporting special needs music education and Help Musicians
PPT Mouthpieces

Reed cases

nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
Location
London
Hi all,

I am about 6 months into playing the alto and am progressing fine. However, there are still basics things which I am learning all the time. One question which I have is does one need to invest in a decent reed case or will it suffice simply to keep them in their original cardboard boxes or some sort of paper/metal container? You can get humidity control cases and ones which monitor air flow - are these necessary or just a gimmick? I have an old tobacco tin which may do the trick!
 

nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
Location
London
Yeah, I have been using Rico and now Fred Hemke reeds - they both come with plastic sheaths. Just am unsure if it is OK to keep them in these and then store them in some sort of metal container?
 

Sunray

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,709
Location
Norfolk, UK
Last edited by a moderator:

Pete Thomas

Well-Known Member
Commercial Supporter
Messages
14,858
Location
St. Mary's
I either keep them in the plastic holders or just loose in a drawer.

The advantage of the hygrocase thingies is they take a lot longer to dry out, and so don't crinkle up when you put them on (if still very slightly damp).

The disadvantafe is in humid climates or very enclosed spaces they never dry out, and so the reeds can get mouldy.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,215
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
I like the Hygrocase "thingies" (I have the 4 reed Vandoren case), and use them for soprano, alto & tenor - the Rico and Vandoren individual reed holders are useful, especially as most of the reeds that I now buy are held in cardboard. They do dry out more slowly in the hygrocase, as Pete says, and I find it useful to carry reeds about in. Not tried any of the others so cannot comment. Good care of reeds can save you money in the long run.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Café Supporter
Messages
21,912
Location
Just north of Munich
I've got a LA Voz holder for the tenor reeeds, this either sits on my desk or goes in the tin. Never had any problems doing this. The alto reeds go in a Rico humidifier case, but without the pads to keep things moist. Seems to work fine, and they're always a touch moist when they come out, so play a bit quicker than the tenor ones. Doing this I haven't had any mould problems, but it's not really hot/humid around here.

My teacher, old school, has a wooden case, with a sheet of glass in it, the reeds slip under a piece of elastic, so aren't held very tightly, but that seems to work fine. If you don't store them in something that'll hold them flat, then they can warp, which doen't help the way they play....
 

nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
Location
London
Thanks everyone - think I will simply opt for the Reed Guard iv's. I must admit to not even rotating reeds much and so I will start to do this and use the tips from 814jazzer - though this does seem to take up a long time!
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
Café Supporter
Messages
6,002
Location
Minster On Sea
Mine live in the plastic holders they come in. But they're kept in a watertight plastic food box with a bit of vodka swilling around in it. Works for me.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,215
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
I have just ordered a Rico 8 reed humidifier case, which looks interesting, and would allow me to have a few more Alto reeds on the go.
I will happily feed back when I have used it for a while.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

Pyrografix

Senile Member
Messages
1,020
Location
Sunny Aberdeenshire
I have a couple of the Rico reed humidifier cases (clarinet and sax) which I picked up on the dreaded eBay but haven't been using them for long. However I have just changed from the 73% humidity pack to the 84% to see if you really can play straight from the case......... will let you know if they work!

Matilda
 

SteveK

Member
Messages
148
Location
Guildford, Surrey
Mine live in an old jam jar with a couple of centimetres of gin. Not sure what the gin does but they seem to last longer and they taste great when you take them out!
I learn this from an oboe player who says that he has had reeds that have lasted for years.
I can't agree or disagree but it's a great conversation piece.
 

Popular Discussions

Top Bottom