All profit supporting special needs music education and Help Musicians
SYOS

Recording Recording Studios with Mixing Deck and Magnetic Tapes

Have you ever recorded anything in a professional recording studio?

  • Several times

    Votes: 9 60.0%
  • Once or twice

    Votes: 3 20.0%
  • Never

    Votes: 3 20.0%

  • Total voters
    15

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,830
Location
brighton by the sea
And hairstyles.

I loved all the ritual of the old studios. All weekend and All night and late sessions, eating crap blah blah.waiting to play and for engineers to sort everything out ahhhh.very fond memories.
I remember the first day of recording an album in central brighton back in 2005. We descended into the underground bunker with instruments, junk food etc mid morning one summer day and worked for about fifteen hours straight… on coming back up at about 2am we discovered we had totally missed FatBoy Slim’s infamous beach party (a nationally infamous debarcle). It felt like we’d popped back up into the zombie apocalypse- utter chaos and mile upon mile of drunken idiots.. one of the most surreal experiences of my life
 

randulo

Living the dream
Café Supporter
Messages
6,237
Location
France
I have dozens of DATs and my Sony recorder died after being fixed once or twice. Zoom-like devices work better today.
 

Iain

Member
Messages
35
Location
Helsiki Finland
Additional option:
What was the first format you recorded on in a studio?
With the demographics so far, I'd say probably 2" 24-track tape?
First time in a pro studio, mid 60s. Ampex 3-track. Backing track recorded across two tracks, with the third tracks saved for vocals. Soon after, the Studer J37 (valve/tube electronics) became the industrial workhorse (Beatles, Moody Blues etc) To get more tracks, submixes were made 4 to 2 tracks (of a second 4 track machine. Halcyon days! When eight track on 1" arrived (Scully, Studer etc) we had the luxury of putting Bass drum and Bass on separate tracks - a quantum leap!
 

randulo

Living the dream
Café Supporter
Messages
6,237
Location
France
First time in a pro studio, mid 60s. Ampex 3-track. Backing track recorded across two tracks, with the third tracks saved for vocals. Soon after, the Studer J37 (valve/tube electronics) became the industrial workhorse (Beatles, Moody Blues etc) To get more tracks, submixes were made 4 to 2 tracks (of a second 4 track machine. Halcyon days! When eight track on 1" arrived (Scully, Studer etc) we had the luxury of putting Bass drum and Bass on separate tracks - a quantum leap!
:p you didn't mention wire. That was my first, although I may have already said it.
Still, very impressive foundation, sir.
 

Iain

Member
Messages
35
Location
Helsiki Finland
:p you didn't mention wire. That was my first, although I may have already said it.
Still, very impressive foundation, sir.
Wire was interesting, but lamentably poor for music.

The studio were I was apprenticed had a technical store with equipment going back to 1927. A colleague and I made a recording using an acoustic wax-cylinder recorder with a huge horn. There were plenty of good musicians on the studio staff. The tune we recorded was Duke Ellington's "Chloe" Cornet, alto, tenor, trombone, piano, banjo, tuba, drums. One take only - no overdubs or editing!! Great fun!
 

randulo

Living the dream
Café Supporter
Messages
6,237
Location
France
Wire was interesting, but lamentably poor for music.

The studio were I was apprenticed had a technical store with equipment going back to 1927. A colleague and I made a recording using an acoustic wax-cylinder recorder with a huge horn. There were plenty of good musicians on the studio staff. The tune we recorded was Duke Ellington's "Chloe" Cornet, alto, tenor, trombone, piano, banjo, tuba, drums. One take only - no overdubs or editing!! Great fun!
I give up, you win! :)
And yes, wire was only good for spoken word, and noisy at that.
 

Iain

Member
Messages
35
Location
Helsiki Finland
I give up, you win! :)
And yes, wire was only good for spo

Tape allowed editing. Biggest innovation in music recording since sliced bread.
Indeed. A quantum leap! When recording on multitrack, backing tracks were often made up of two or three takes. We used to cut the 16 or 24 track tape (2inch) to make up a composite for overdubs. Any chatter in the control room faded to nervous silence when you took out the 2" editing block, and white Chinagraph pencil !!
 

Veggie Dave

Sax Worker
Messages
3,283
Location
Citizen of Nowhere
My first ever recording session was on 2" tape, at Mike Harding's studio in Manchester (called Moonraker if I remember correctly). Yes, for the folk people, that Mike Harding. When I started working as an engineer, ADAT had taken over most of Manchester's studios. I can't remember if CDs had made any inroads to the public at that point, though, so mastering to DAT was never an issue.
 

randulo

Living the dream
Café Supporter
Messages
6,237
Location
France
Yes, tape editing was a non-trivial craft, as were the aforementioned sub-mixes! However, now with digital non-destructive editing (NDE) almost anything is possible.
 

Iain

Member
Messages
35
Location
Helsiki Finland
My first ever recording session was on 2" tape, at Mike Harding's studio in Manchester (called Moonraker if I remember correctly). Yes, for the folk people, that Mike Harding. When I started working as an engineer, ADAT had taken over most of Manchester's studios. I can't remember if CDs had made any inroads to the public at that point, though, so mastering to DAT was never an issue.
One can have the best of both worlds, and record in analogue (say Studer A80 24 tracks with Dolby SR) and then transfer to digital and edit, overdub and mix in the digital domain. Great fun!
 

Members online

Popular Discussions

Top Bottom