Studies Recommeded Beginners Music Books

Owen

New Member
Messages
9
Hi,
I've been learning for 3 months and really enjoying it. I currently use "Standard of Excellence" Book 1 which I find logical and helpful in terms of gradually increasing my knowledge/experience. However I'm looking for music to complement this book at the right level which include more popular / familiar music. i.e. Jazz, Blues, soul. Suggestions are very much appreciated.
Owen
 

Moz

Senior Member
Messages
841
Location
North of Liskeard, Cornwall,UK
Hi,
I've been learning for 3 months and really enjoying it. I currently use "Standard of Excellence" Book 1 which I find logical and helpful in terms of gradually increasing my knowledge/experience. However I'm looking for music to complement this book at the right level which include more popular / familiar music. i.e. Jazz, Blues, soul. Suggestions are very much appreciated.
Owen
A couple of books I remember using when I was a starter:

Guest Spot Classic Blues which is a playalong book with CD. Some might say this book is a little strong for a very new player but some of the songs in there are ones you will know and are played a little slower than might normally be heard.

From the same people as the above but this time Guest Spot Film Themes. Easier than the above but very satisfying. I remember my first public playing (OK, to my wife and a couple of friends) was of Schindlers List, the version in this book is very, very slow but that's what you want when you start and it's still a good arrangement.

Some people like the Hal Leonard playalongs but many of them have a melody guide played on a xylophone or some such horrendous instrument which I found most off-putting.

If you have a teacher then Jazzy Duets is a good book (no CD here and no familiar tunes); I still get that out occasionally and record the two parts separately on my Fostex recorder just for the hell of it.

You will no doubt get many more suggestions from others here so I suggest you write them all down on pieces of paper, throw them in the air and buy the first three that you turn over otherwise you will spend more time choosing and very little time playing.

Cheers and good blowing.

Martin
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,367
Location
Sweden
Check John Laughters books:

"Contemporary Saxophone; an introduction to creating a Rock 'n' Roll solo." Other useful tips if you're intrested in Rocksax.

"Rock & Roll Saxophone;
basic techniques and sound effects used in Rock & Roll solo performance."

Thomas
 

JasonC

Member
Messages
218
Location
Swadlincote, Derbyshire
Hi Owen,

I've been practising about 3 months also. You may be at a far higher level than me as I'm learning to read music from scratch also but, the books I have bought recently for fun playing and to help my sight reading are:

16 Famous pop ballads - this includes a CD with 2 backing tracks for each song, one with a sax playing and one without for you to play along.

The Big Book of Alto Sax Songs - This has quite a lot of songs in it at various levels but I haven't had chance to try any yet! I picked it because after a quick read through I though I could probably handle quite a lot of them (just!). This does not have a backing CD.

Obviously they are not Jazz or Blues but for me at the moment they are easy to learn as a lot of the songs I already know in my head.
 

AdamBradley

Member
Messages
134
An idea that might work for you depending on your regular listening and from that, your definition of a tune you'll know..

There are a load of books called 'The Real Book' in various editions (and 'fake book's too). Essentially they're a huge collection of lead sheets for standards and some newer tunes(70s) too. You just get the melody line and the chord changes written above.

Most are in C, but I saw one the other day in Eb. As I said there are loads of editions and there's a lot of debate over which has the best collection of tunes (there's a lot in each book... If I had to guess I'd say maybe 150-200 tunes). The history is quite interesting, the wikipedia page on them is fascinating (to me at least :p) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_Book

I really like them as a basic resource to get a feel for how a lot of well known tunes go, and I often use it for sight reading practise. Also if you have some friends with the same edition in their respective keys, the songs are on the same page numbers so they're great for impromptu play through.

I don't know exactly what you're looking for and how advanced you are - you don't get any tips on how to play them or performance notes like you would with dedicated tuition books.

Definately worth a look though :)
 

Justin Chune

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,951
Location
The Athens of The North
Have a look at Play Gershwin, Faber Music. This book is for Eb/Bb/ piano. New Sax Solos books 1/2/3 by Graham Lyons for the same instruments. Cops Caps & Cadillacs by Chris Gumbly.

If you play alto then you can have a look at these. Peter Wastell. First Repertoire Pieces (Boosey & Hawkes) Streewise by Karen Street. (Boosey & Hawkes) Making the Grade
Books 1/2/3 ( Chester Music) Play Showtime (Books 1/2 Faber Music)

Jim.
 
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Owen

New Member
Messages
9
Beginners music books

Thanks to everyone who has offered suggestions.
Owen
 
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