All profit supporting special needs music education and Help Musicians
Tutorials

reading and solo help

tom9437

Member
Messages
169
Hi all i am reading play along Abersold vol 659four and more]ok example the tune "Four i am ok reading and playing up to the last bar. Then it goes on to the solo eg CA/ D/G7 ect now i am prety much lost how do i work out my solo[ from these i take it are chords].


One more thing please again using "Four i play up to the repeat sign: Then repeat but can someone tell me were do i play up to 2nd time round. Hope you can understand what i am asking please keep both answers seperate lol many thanks and i hope you are all well Tom.
 

Mikec

Member
Messages
196
Hi Tom,
Sorry I don't have that volume, but in general terms the start of the repeat sequence is usually indicated by a vertical line with a "1" in it and a horizontal line above that goes to the end of the repeat sequence. You play that bit the first time. The second time, when you get to the vertical line and the "1", you skip to the second repeat which starts with a vertical line and the number "2". I hope this is clear!

As for the solo, you are expected to improvise a solo using the chord symbols written above the bar. You can use either the notes from the chords, or the notes from the scale which those chords are derived from. Or, of course, you can just use your ears, it's jazz after all! Have fun and take chances.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Hi Tom,
Sorry I don't have that volume, but in general terms the start of the repeat sequence is usually indicated by a vertical line with a "1" in it and a horizontal line above that goes to the end of the repeat sequence. You play that bit the first time. The second time, when you get to the vertical line and the "1", you skip to the second repeat which starts with a vertical line and the number "2". I hope this is clear!
Don't quite agree - the repeat usually starts well before the 1/bar where the repeat mak is (colon). The 1 denotes the ending of the repeated section, to be followed first time tthrough, while the 2 is the end of the repeated section to be played second time through.


Or am I wrong and you get the 1/2 anywhere in the repeated section.
 

half diminished

Senior Member
Messages
1,302
Tom. I did reply in response to your previous post in the Breakfastroom......


You play the first 12 bars through both times. After the first time through, complete the next 4 bars (1). Bars 13 to 16 are not repeated the second time you play through - you play the final (2) 4 bars.

As for the solo, I play tenor and don't have the Eb dots (nor your Aebersold version) but my book says first 2 bars in one key (that's F major for me), next 4 bars in Bb major but using a II, V7, I chord progression and then it switches at bar 7 to Ab major for 2 bars using a II, V7 progression. Then at bar 9 it's back to F major for 1 bar then F# major etc etc.

It's a big old subject and perhaps best explained by Pete on his site here.

It took me ages to get it but once it clicks you'll be fine. Then you just gotta keep working on it!
 

tom9437

Member
Messages
169
Hi all thanks a bit confusing lol but thank you it will sink in i am just a bit thick lol speak soon tom
 

Mikec

Member
Messages
196
Don't quite agree - the repeat usually starts well before the 1/bar where the repeat mak is (colon). The 1 denotes the ending of the repeated section, to be followed first time tthrough, while the 2 is the end of the repeated section to be played second time through.


Or am I wrong and you get the 1/2 anywhere in the repeated section.
There's some confusion here between repeats and alternative endings I think. The repeat mark is a colon and thickened bar line, at this point you go back to the beginning (or other mark). In my Aebersold books, if there is an alternative ending (i.e. a second ending) you jump to it at the point in the music where the first ending begins, as I said, a vertical line with a "1". The start of the second ending, where you jump to, is marked by a line and a "2". But there are variations, I know.
 

saxnik

Member
Messages
381
OK, I'm trying to type this quickly, since my last essay on this was lost when I got logged off for slow behaviour.

I have Aebersold 65, and 'Four' like all the tunes in here is structured in 'choruses' (five of them of 32 bars in this case).
The 'form' of the chorus starts after the first three notes of the tune, at the double barline. Call the first three notes the 'upbeat' notes or bar 0 if you prefer.
Bar one starts with a double barline with a Colon after it. This is a repeat mark, showing you where to come back to.
Bars 1-4 inclusive are the first line, bars 5-8 the second, and bars 9-12 the third. Bars 13-16 come under a bracket with '1.' in it, this is called a 'first time bar' marking, meaning you only play this fourth line the first time around. Bar 16 ends with another double barline with a colon before it. This means repeat back from here to the 'start repeat' bar (i.e. go back to bar 1 again). Bars 17-20 come under a bracket with '2.' in it, meaning you substitute these 'second time' bars for the 'first time' bars you played last time.

So you play:
Upbeat (after 3 of the count-in)
bars 1-12 (lines 1, 2 & 3)
bars 13-16 (line 4)
bars 1-12 again
bars 17-20
(total 32)
Then repeat this whole 32 bar business four more times (insert the upbeat into the 'break' if you like).

The reason the chords section is written out again is that the chords for the 'solos' section are slightly different than those for the tune. If you want to keep playing the tune over and over (and this would be my preference to start with, then embellish it as you get to know it better and better) it should still fit. The first and second time brackets extend over more of the bars, but they still add up to 32 in total.
To add to the confusion there's also a 'Coda' (another type of jump in the score, last time only, you jump from the first circle-with-a-cross-through-it, like a target crosshair, to the second) which adds a final chord at the end of the 32-bar form.

If you want to go down the route of learning to improvise from chords and scales, you've chosen a fairly meaty book, there are some complicated charts in it. I was recommended to start with Vol 54, 'Maiden Voyage', which has some really simple bluesy and modal tunes with lots less in the way of chord changes, so you can practice a smaller amount of notes to get your ears into gear with the improvising, though Four isn't a bad one. I for one still don't understand 'Giant Steps', but that's a whole new thread...

Good luck,

Nick
 
Last edited by a moderator:

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
There's some confusion here between repeats and alternative endings I think. The repeat mark is a colon and thickened bar line, at this point you go back to the beginning (or other mark). In my Aebersold books, if there is an alternative ending (i.e. a second ending) you jump to it at the point in the music where the first ending begins, as I said, a vertical line with a "1". The start of the second ending, where you jump to, is marked by a line and a "2". But there are variations, I know.
Sorry, still not with you - from what you say, it sounds as if Abersold is using the same notation to denote alternative endings and the differences in first time through/second time through. But why would you jump to '1' ? I'd expect that to follow on from the normal music.
 

saxnik

Member
Messages
381
Aebersold notation is a subset of music theory, but not a very important one! He's just tried to get each piece onto its own page, that's all, and it's bewildering, best not to worry too much!
 

Mikec

Member
Messages
196
Sorry, still not with you - from what you say, it sounds as if Abersold is using the same notation to denote alternative endings and the differences in first time through/second time through. But why would you jump to '1' ? I'd expect that to follow on from the normal music.
OK I haven't explained it well enough. Saxnik's post is a much better job.
 

Mikec

Member
Messages
196
Mike c, dont be silly my friend your explination was fantasticregards Tom
Thanks, Tom, but I'm not a teacher, and I know my limitations! You'll find that reading these music flow things is much easier done than talked about when you get the hang of it. Good luck!
 
Saxholder Pro
Help!Mailing List
Top Bottom