All profit supporting special needs music education and Help Musicians
Tutorials

Re-attaching a post

stefank

Member
Messages
366
I've had a post come off the venerable collection of re-solders and dent repairs that is my Martin Indiana alto. Should I be able to get it re-attached with the aid of some solder and a little gas torch/soldering iron (positioning it does not seem to be a problem), or is it take it to the tech time?
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Supporter
Messages
13,977
I've had a post come off the venerable collection of re-solders and dent repairs that is my Martin Indiana alto. Should I be able to get it re-attached with the aid of some solder and a little gas torch/soldering iron (positioning it does not seem to be a problem), or is it take it to the tech time?
If it was me, I'd worry about all the other posts dropping off as soon as the body got hot enough.
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,804
If you know how to solder you can do it yourself. The toneholes on a Indiana is softsoldered so bevare that the heat from the tourch is not to high. I can do some soldering but my friend, a former metalworker for the surgical medical industry, is far better. So I let him do all soldering.

Thomas
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Hi stefank, don't take the risk!!!!!!! I wouldn't (you would probably need heat sinks), and I used to do a lot of soldering and brazing.

John.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
If you really want to do it (and I wouldn't, despite being able to solder) make sure you practice a good few times on some scrap brass first.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
If you do it yourself, remember to let us know how you get on.

Jon
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,374
I used to have a great "The Martin" baritone from the 50s and various bits used to pop off at unpredictable times: a few posts and a guard I think.

And I also have a Martin from the 40s that is stencilled as an Old Super and the neck tenon came off when it was being repaired.

I wonder whether Martin used a type of solder that is particularly prone to failing - maybe to do with their soldered-on toneholes ?

Rhys
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,804
I used to have a great "The Martin" baritone from the 50s and various bits used to pop off at unpredictable times: a few posts and a guard I think.

And I also have a Martin from the 40s that is stencilled as an Old Super and the neck tenon came off when it was being repaired.

I wonder whether Martin used a type of solder that is particularly prone to failing - maybe to do with their soldered-on toneholes ?

Rhys
I have some Marin saxes and it’s just my ”The Martin Baritone” that have one (1) resoldered post. My other Martins are clean when it comes to this. In fact I think Martins are very wellmade.

Martins toneholes are softsoldered (lower temperature) instead of hard/silversoldered. I don’t know why Martin used this method. Most of the manufactors (King, Beuscher, Tonkng(CZ).... ) that had soldered-on toneholes that were silversoldered. Just a few (two?) manufactors used softsolder. I think it has something to do with the shape of a Martin chimney, I/we think it’s harder and more time-consuming to resolder a Martin tonehole with silversoldering compared to softsoldering. I have also heard that Martin changed the solder formula in the 50’s for work enviroment reasons.

This is my own thoughts and the information is not confirmed. So take it for what it is!

Thomas
 

phooesnax

Member
Messages
96
DO NOT do it! If you overheat the area all of the posts will drop off and/or move slightly. When they put these on they hold them all with a jig.
 
Saxholder Pro

Members online

Help!Mailing List
Top Bottom