Questions on Parker

Linky Lee

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182
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Salisbury, UK
Been going through some of my favorite tunes in the Omnibook and analysing them from a theory viewpoint and a chordal/arpeggio approach.
I've come across a few snippets here and there in a couple tunes where I don't understand the theory going on behind the music.

1. Moose the Mooche: in the head over the D7 chord (I'm guessing altered scale?)

2. Moose the Mooche: Line 4, beats 3 and 4 for the G7 chord - I'm seeing E maj triad how does that substitute in that chord sequence?

3. Ornithology: Line 8, over the E- chordbeats 1 and 2

4. Ornithology: Line 8, over the B7+9 beats 3 and 4

5. Ornithology: Line 9 over the C sharp 7 and following G sharp minor chord

6. Anthropology: Line 10 over the A- D7 progression.

7. Anthropology: Line 12 over the 2nd B7 chord.

Any help would be appreciated. Don't feel you have to give an answer for all if you don't have one for each point. Cheers.
 

Morgan Fry

Senior Member
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447
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Leeds
I assume we're in Eb? Then

1) is a blues lick in G.

2) E7 is the 6 of the tonic. So look at bar 13-15 as an altered 1-6-2-5-1. G7-(E7)-C-F7 is nearly G-E7-Am7-D7b9#9. Look at them on the piano, you'll see how little difference there is.

3) you could call the first 3 beats F#m-B7b9-Em (2-5-1).

4) maybe look at this as an Am7b5 substituted for Eb7 going to the Abm in the next bar

5)

6) Bar 9 -11 of this chorus go G-G+-Am. A fairly common rising chromatic line. Over rhythm changes a common idea is to ignore the endless 1-6-2-5-1 cycle and play something else in the tonic key that has its own internal logic. Matter of fact, Bird does this sort of thing all the time -- ignore the actual changes and play something that is harmonically functionally equivalent (e.g., substituting Am7 over Eb7, D+ over D7, F7 over D7 (all acting as dominants)).

7) Cm6 over B7. The altered scale derives from this substitution.

Seems like you might tend to look at one chord at a time too much. Look at where the phrases are going. Find the resolution of the line, then look at how it got there. Plenty of the time Bird's lines will have their own internal logic independent of the rhythm section's.
 
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Linky Lee

Linky Lee

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182
Location
Salisbury, UK
Hi, I'll get the book out and try and put that info into what I see.

I think you're right about me looking at the chord on it's own too much and not thinking about the progression or phrase. I think it's easier when I sit down at a piano and play it. I don't have one at the moment though.

Cheers!
 
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Linky Lee

Linky Lee

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Messages
182
Location
Salisbury, UK
Hi, have sat down with your explanations and the notes in front of me and it all makes a lot more sense now looking at where it is all going. Thanks.

It's amazing to be able to spontaneously apply these alterations and reharmonisations within the improvisation, I'm only just getting my head around playing the arpeggios to their 9th over chords.

That's a wonder in itself! I've had so much fun going through tunes in the real book playing around with the arpeggios, feels like a break through in my improvisation skills. Mega happy at the moment, I don't want to go to bed but can't play either because it's too late!
 

visionari1

Senior Member
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Out in the Countryside of Nelson NZ
Linkey,
Seems like you earned that improvment, starting to see myself how the theory can really add to the understanding, which leads to "light bulb moments"
As you mentioned the keyboard really made it clearer.

Top marks to Morgan Fry as well.

I'm only just grasping it a little, which is better than before.

Thanks Fellas
Ciao:mrcool:welldone
 
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Linky Lee

Linky Lee

Member
Messages
182
Location
Salisbury, UK
Yeah I'm getting to the point where I sufficiently know all twelve keys in major and minor along with their 9th arpeggios so that I can put them over chord sequences. - It's almost improvising!

I've just got to work on making it melodic and apply all the other things I know, am learning and yet to learn to it too. haha.

I've found so far that it's quite easy to 'play the changes' with a basic improvisation but it's ridiculously hard to make the improvisation flow between chord to chord and get rid of the blocky diatonic nature/sound of it. You know, really 'play' the changes. - maybe this should be a new thread?
 

Morgan Fry

Senior Member
Messages
447
Location
Leeds
yeah, playing changes is a whole rich subject in itself. The main thing, though, is good voice leading. What works to connet chord to chord doesn't really change and was well studied in the baroque era. Many of the same rules still apply.
 
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