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pvc flute

rob1969

Member
Messages
134
Location
hull. east yorkshire
hi peeps had a good cupple of days on sax its geting better well anyway
was looking into making 1 of the flute jobs you see flouting about on youtube and such like been tinkering about in shed first toy i made this week was a pvc spud gun this things hot runs of air spray chanber made from a flask with 3inch barrle just nice for the golf ball first shot was iffy second 1 straight frow 45g oil drum best hide that way will upload pic later to day

no starting flute all cut to lengh mp made plays in key of g just got to place finger holes trick bit so been good so far update you all when finished i love this forum nice bunch of peeps of chit chat help info and any other stuff that gose on in saxophone world

:sax::sax::sax::sax::sax:
 

losaavedra

Member
Messages
392
Location
Rojales, Spain
Reading this I have already been more than a little curious regarding the following:

Does anybody know the formula for spacing holes in a piece of tubing so as to get a chromatic scale out of the thing with a suitable mouthpiece attached, and while I'm at it, are the holes of equal diameter, if not what difference, if any, does that make to the spacing? Let's take a straight (i.e. equal diameter all the way down) tube for starters because maybe a widening tube needs a different formula?!? This may seem to be a crazy thing to be asking but, with 'strings' for example, because I've hand-made quite a few guitars, I know exactly how to place frets (or fingers if 'fretless') to get every single note for any scale length from as short as (say) ukelele through to as long as (say) bass or beyond. Is it the same general principle for vibrating air, or does something else need to be taken into account? Chimes are also interesting things to me. Given some (metal) tube, of constant diameter, is there a straightforward formula that tells us what length each chunk of tube should be to get each of the notes one wants in order to play a western scale-based tune? Because I have an inquisitive nature (!) I've already experimented sound-wise by sticking my alto mp on the front of my trumpet ... the sound that came out from doing that was really quite bizarre, basically comprising a series of extemely low pitched notes at least a couple of octaves below Concert middle C (as far as I had a mind to identify what they were). Although I'm not sure what's happening there I think one day that particular 'sound' may well come in handy for something that I want to do. So its worthwhile looking into this kind of thing in my opinion!

So ...have we got any physicists in the BR who can shed some light on all this?????
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Mike,
Have a look at Doug Tipple's site. He makes very playable plastic transverse keyless flutes and has some interesting items like the Fajardo wedge that serves the same purpose as the reverse taper on the head of a Böhm flute.
Other than that, The University of New South Wales has some very interesting pages on sound production in musical instruments but your maths had better be better than mine.
Apologies for being serious.
 
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rob1969

Member
Messages
134
Location
hull. east yorkshire
flute

Reading this I have already been more than a little curious regarding the following:

Does anybody know the formula for spacing holes in a piece of tubing so as to get a chromatic scale out of the thing with a suitable mouthpiece attached, and while I'm at it, are the holes of equal diameter, if not what difference, if any, does that make to the spacing? Let's take a straight (i.e. equal diameter all the way down) tube for starters because maybe a widening tube needs a different formula?!? This may seem to be a crazy thing to be asking but, with 'strings' for example, because I've hand-made quite a few guitars, I know exactly how to place frets (or fingers if 'fretless') to get every single note for any scale length from as short as (say) ukelele through to as long as (say) bass or beyond. Is it the same general principle for vibrating air, or does something else need to be taken into account? Chimes are also interesting things to me. Given some (metal) tube, of constant diameter, is there a straightforward formula that tells us what length each chunk of tube should be to get each of the notes one wants in order to play a western scale-based tune? Because I have an inquisitive nature (!) I've already experimented sound-wise by sticking my alto mp on the front of my trumpet ... the sound that came out from doing that was really quite bizarre, basically comprising a series of extemely low pitched notes at least a couple of octaves below Concert middle C (as far as I had a mind to identify what they were). Although I'm not sure what's happening there I think one day that particular 'sound' may well come in handy for something that I want to do. So its worthwhile looking into this kind of thing in my opinion!

So ...have we got any physicists in the BR who can shed some light on all this?????
hi you can use this http://www.cwo.com/~ph_kosel/flutomat.html you can change to any key if link fauls google flutomat this is what you need
have fun
 
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