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SYOS

Progress Report

Jazzaferri

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,595
the fingers discussion is about how to play fast. By consciously focussing the majority of your attention to how the fingers are moving (extra motion or sloppy timing smooth relaxed etc) real speed can be achieved. accurate scales and patterns in 8ths at 300 bpm are doable. That allows for clean 16ths at 150 LOL
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,045
Finger speed and usually more importantly, even-ness can be worked on in a variety of ways. You don't have to think of the fingers if you think that's detrimental. Think of the sound and any un-even movement will be sorted out by BRAIN Randy :)

My favourite at college though, whilst working on Paul Jean-Jean finger studies for clarinet, was to use the key clanking rhythms to keep my fingers in time. It was quite mesmeric.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,045
As for 'trick' fingerings, other than the very well-known ones, the classical players on here will know more. I'm sure there are plenty of passages in the classical sax repertoire that are almost unplayable without a few invented fingerings here and there.

There are also the fingerings used to create more resonance - based upon the low fundamentals. Again, classical territory and will be used, if at all in slower passages to balance tonal discrepancies within the horn note-to-note.

I use these extensively on the clarinet but never much at all on the sax, especially not being a classical player of the sax.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,045
The muted A for example: play an A (LH12) and press RH123 on and off to mess with the sound.
You can also vary the RH 3 fingers - in quick movement (separately) they sound like articulation - like triple tonguing. Sanborn has used it extensively. This stuff works on high harmonic A too.

You can find the others, if you're in a key where the A doesn't fit. They're based upon the root of the harmonic series. A is based upon low D for example, so it is the 12th. Most are the 12th, or double octave. They can be found by trial and error - try one of the low notes and overblow. The odd removed finger will enhance the sound. Bb is harder to find, but works like the A if you use the little overlapped key with LH 1.

There must be a Pete Thomas tutorial on this. @Pete Thomas ?
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
Subscriber
Messages
3,793
I want to start a post as soon as I figure out the exact names of notes on all saxes. B0 or B1 starts?
What is the "open" C# (look ma, no hands) is it C#1 or C#2?

Or, as Pete E asked, are we using the piano numbers (no, that would vary with each saxophone family!)
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
Subscriber
Messages
3,793
Sounds like a plan! The official Café Saxophone position, assuming the political endorsement of @Pete Thomas is that the first register is 1, second two, etc.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,045
Sounds like a plan! The official Café Saxophone position, assuming the political endorsement of @Pete Thomas is that the first register is 1, second two, etc.
I think the clarinet numbering works like this but it's been so long that I've been in that merry-go-round I can't remember.
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
Subscriber
Messages
3,793
It seemed to me that register was a clarinet term and not used for sax, but I guess that's wrong. It's only been about 6 decades since I had a clarinet.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,045
It seemed to me that register was a clarinet term and not used for sax, but I guess that's wrong. It's only been about 6 decades since I had a clarinet.
Both work (octave and register) on the sax. Like all fingered instruments at some point you reach a "break" with all fingers removed and you need to start the whole fingering sequence again.
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
Subscriber
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5,393
Sounds like a plan! The official Café Saxophone position, assuming the political endorsement of @Pete Thomas is that the first register is 1, second two, etc.
Assuming that the first “register” starts with C (C1?) then are the bell keys called B0 and Bb0?
And don’t forget that bari saxes go down to A.
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Café Supporter
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13,357
Sounds like a plan! The official Café Saxophone position, assuming the political endorsement of @Pete Thomas is that the first register is 1, second two, etc.
Assuming that the first “register” starts with C (C1?) then are the bell keys called B0 and Bb0?
And don’t forget that bari saxes go down to A.

Bottom Bb on a saxophone is Bb1 IMO. It's not any kind of official cafe position though.
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
Subscriber
Messages
3,793
Ok, let us agree on that and all is well!

Now, during all this I did a few takes of "Jonesy" at the original medium or slow tempo today, Friday Feb 7th. I learned it Saturday so I am one week in. I think I'm getting a better handle on the bridge changes, I've left a couple of notes in this take that were muddled, but you can hear the intended target. One is right in that beginning which is an octave exercise. I must practice it as an exercise. The brain I refer to above is hearing things that the fingers think they can do, but sometimes fumble. I'm spending time on this song because those chord changes always felt strange to me, I'm not a big 2-5-1 booster, but this tune has helped understand the resolutions of those keys.

https://soundcloud.com/randulo%2Fhave-you-met-miss-jones-fri View: https://soundcloud.com/randulo/have-you-met-miss-jones-fri
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,045
Ok, let us agree on that and all is well!

Now, during all this I did a few takes of "Jonesy" at the original medium or slow tempo today, Friday Feb 7th. I learned it Saturday so I am one week in. I think I'm getting a better handle on the bridge changes, I've left a couple of notes in this take that were muddled, but you can hear the intended target. One is right in that beginning which is an octave exercise. I must practice it as an exercise. The brain I refer to above is hearing things that the fingers think they can do, but sometimes fumble. I'm spending time on this song because those chord changes always felt strange to me, I'm not a big 2-5-1 booster, but this tune has helped understand the resolutions of those keys.

https://soundcloud.com/randulo%2Fhave-you-met-miss-jones-fri View: https://soundcloud.com/randulo/have-you-met-miss-jones-fri
Lovely intro.
 
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