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Problems with pay pal

jeremyjuicewah

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,890
Help!!! This fiendish set up is such rubbish!!! This afternoon I used pay pal to donate to the charity. Now I want to do it again and it will not allow me to log in. No typos, address and password just as earlier today. I have requested to change password and am simply asked to log in again and when I cannot I am asked have I forgotten my password, would I like to register a new one so I say I would and am them asked to log in which I cannot and so I am asked do I want to change my password and so on and so on and I am about ready to commit murder or vomit, I know not which. Can anyone suggest anything short of going to pay pal's secret HQ and being very bloody indeed? Am I alone in experiencing recurring problems with pay pal? If so, why me? Why not someone who does not deserve it. I am often the victim of circumstances I do not deserve, at least in my opinion, so why visit this on me just because I probably do deserve it this time? Is it just because I am here, now? Seriously, any pay pal nerds who have the inside info on being a happy pay pal customer, please tell me how to be one too and if you can point towards the goal of tying my own shoelaces I will be forever in your debt.

Traumatised of Jalon.
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,272
If i am having any log in problems with any site that i'm trying to enter, i just close it down and go back to it later and try again, but iv'e never really had any problems with paypal.
Just a pointer ALWAYS enter paypal through the main site and not a link to the site (but you already know this)
 

Pyrografix

Senile Member
Messages
1,026
I had a similar problem with eBay last week (they own Paypal as well) which lasted for 24 hours. I eventually found out it was a tech fault with ebay itself, which was eventually sorted at source.

I suggest you wait a while and try again later......

Cheers,

Amanda
 

jeremyjuicewah

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,890
Finally done it. By copy and paste a link into my address bar I was allowed to change my password. I tried for my old one and it said I could not use an existing password linked to the account, so the password was correct. I put in my card no. to verify identity and they would not accept it, incorrect. I answered the security questions and was finally allowed to change the password. At least I know it was not my studpity, it was theirs. Thanks for the tips guy,
Mike
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Subscriber
Messages
5,944
Finally done it. By copy and paste a link into my address bar I was allowed to change my password. I tried for my old one and it said I could not use an existing password linked to the account, so the password was correct. I put in my card no. to verify identity and they would not accept it, incorrect. I answered the security questions and was finally allowed to change the password. At least I know it was not my studpity, it was theirs. Thanks for the tips guy,
Mike
I do wonder sometimes what level of testing these things get before they are released into the wild.
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,483
I am not the paypal's keeper but I think that they have been riddled , recently, with ever increasing regulations that makes their lives (and ours) rather complicated.

A paypal account is now considered because of European regulation a bank account so it requires a number of security checks and other things to, for example, protect us from the possibility that paypal is used to launder dirty money.

Recently I received an email from paypal which I thought it was a spoof mail and they told me that my account was about to be closed if I didn’t provide them information that wasn’t previously required.

I wrote to the paypal spoof address ( where you report spoof and physhing attempts) to ask about this mail and they answered that it wasn’t a fraudulent mail but in fact a real one.

It took me a few days to understand what they really wanted from me (couldn’t at first) then the matter was solved by sending them a picture of my passport (specifically requested) and a declaration that I am in no way running a shop with my account although I have registered as a premium controlled account.
 

jeremyjuicewah

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,890
Ahhhh, I recently deleted an e mail purportedly from pay pal, perhaps it wasnt the scam I thought it would be. But still and all, I was able to use the account then denied access just hours later.
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,483
well, it could have been one of theirs that was telling you to do something similar to mine, you can check with them before discarding mail like that. You can reach them both on the phone and via mail.
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Subscriber
Messages
5,944
Anti-money laundering legislation in Europe is fierce with severe penalties on banks for failing to exercise due dilligence. It's even worse if your organisation is also registered on the US Stock Exchange as the Fed in the States is even more ferocious.

Banks and payment providers have to provide real-time validation of all payment transactions. When you consider how many transactions are made per day (I think over 100 million per day in the UK), that is a very big demand. It's also extremely expensive stuff.
 
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Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Pay Pal works OK as a money transfer system, but they are a completely different proposition when used by small and medium internet sellers as a credit card merchant service provider. One of their tactics is to suddenly decide , for apparent security purposes, to withold a huge % of a firms income from card sales for a supposedly set period. They sit on £Ms of other people's money in this way, earning huge amounts of interest for themselves. If the company goes out of business due to this, so what? they just keep the money. There are websites devoted to this kind of scam by them and I am told someone has written a book on it. There's much more, but don't get me started!
YC
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Subscriber
Messages
5,944
Pay Pal works OK as a money transfer system, but they are a completely different proposition when used by small and medium internet sellers as a credit card merchant service provider. One of their tactics is to suddenly decide , for apparent security purposes, to withold a huge % of a firms income from card sales for a supposedly set period. They sit on £Ms of other people's money in this way, earning huge amounts of interest for themselves. If the company goes out of business due to this, so what? they just keep the money. There are websites devoted to this kind of scam by them and I am told someone has written a book on it. There's much more, but don't get me started!
YC
It's bizarre as banks are most definitely not allowed to do this, so why should an organisation that is offering 'merchant voucher payment services' be allowed to get away with it? Another case of the regulators being on the wrong foot, again.
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
It's because Pay Pal are not a bank (as they keep telling their public) and they are based in Luxembourg. Their attitude seems to be that if you don't like it you should take them to court, but of course they are not in the UK and they have all your money!

Not that UK companies won't try it. Streamline, once NatWest/RBSs' owned merchant service provider, does the same thing now that they have been sold off after the RBS debacle. Their contract terms let them alter trading conditions too "protect" themselves. I know of one case where they demanded over £100K security from a small firm within 7 days with no prior notice, failing which they started to withold all credit card receipts until they reached that sum. At least it's possible to take legal action against them in the UK, but again it's sometimes too late or too lengthy a process.
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,545
Why are you surprised, YC?

They are bankers at heart but in disguise and share the same moral standards. Ask then about ethics and they tell you it is a County on the North bank of the Thames.
 

Moz

Senior Member
Messages
855
Why are you surprised, YC?

They are bankers at heart but in disguise and share the same moral standards. Ask then about ethics and they tell you it is a County on the North bank of the Thames.
I got it. I see what you did there. :)))
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Subscriber
Messages
5,944
Hence my comments about the regulator. There are organisations that follow the rules and it costs a lot of money to do so. Then there are those who are technically not covered by the rules, who don't bear those costs, etc you don't need me to elucidate.

Whilst for understandable reasons banks are not flavour of the month (and it suits politicians and others to maintain that positon), they are only partly at fault. The regulator carries at least as much for failing to do their job. The regulator is also obsessed with making "high-profile" cases and examples that wear well with certain media elements rather than doing the real work of regulating - that actually requires real work and understanding.
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Not surprised, Bill. Just letting people be warned with some home truths.
I used to like ethics but now it makes me thick.

Don't get me started on independent statutory regulators either, TV, having worked in one (not financial services)!
YC
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Subscriber
Messages
5,944
Not surprised, Bill. Just letting people be warned with some home truths.
I used to like ethics but now it makes me thick.

Don't get me started on independent statutory regulators either, TV, having worked in one (not financial services)!
YC
Sympathise - I've been invovled in developing IT solutions and been impacted by some of the whims (and I mean whims) of several of the regulators. I have seen ludicrous stuff demanded, that will never be used, or is extremely difficult to do, but it costs megabucks to develop. Multiply that out across all of the companies that have to comply and it must be eating a lot of financial resources that could be better employed.
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,545
This is philosophical, not political, Kev.

Guess it is the grab it all for myself society that's been created. Anyone else recall the Names at Lloyds moaning when they discovered that sometimes they have to pay out? Anyone remember the rush of the Mutual Insurance organisations to become profit making companies? Anyone remember the rush for the Trust Banks to become profit making? It was the lenders/borrowers who changed the status of their mutuals hoping to make the promised profit with their share allocation. Wonder if they regret it now?

Got that off my chest, back to sleep.
 
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