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Saxophones Presenting my vintage Conn saxophone collection.

CryptoHead

CryptoHead

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My attraction for the saxophone was literally "love at first sight" even before I learned how to play.
Being a mechanical engineer and having owned a machine shop for 35 years, my desire to get my hands on them and take them apart was big.
So I started my retirement hobby buying and rebuilding old Conn saxophones for a couple of years.
Here's the result.

Going clockwise:
1- Conn Tenor Saxophone Model 10M - Year 1951 - Finish Brass
2- Conn Tenor Saxophone New Wonder 1 Artist Special - Year 1917 - Finish Chrome
3- Conn Curved Soprano Saxophone New Wonder - Year 1923 - Finish Silver
4- Conn Alto Saxophone New Wonder 1 Artist Special - Year 1917 - Finish Silver
5- Conn Melody Saxophone Strait Neck - Year 1921 - Finish Silver
6- Conn Melody Saxophone New Wonder 1 Artist Special - Year 1917 - Finish Silver

1654805456799


They all play well, and I take them out "for a ride" every now and then.
Enjoy and regards,

Rodrigo
 
CryptoHead

CryptoHead

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Hello ferguscullen,

They play up and down their range as all pads are new, well seated, and adjusted. If there is a leak, they go back to the bench for fixing.

These old saxes have a great sound. I guess being played for so many years enhances the sound qualities and metal vibrations, so I have heard.

Also, they are very nice looking, being silver-plated and some have a inside gold-plated bell.
The drawback is their ergonomics which are not up to par with modern saxes.
When playing fast or difficult passages, I rather pick up my Yanagisawa Tenor or Yamaha alto.

Thanks for asking.
Regards,

Rodrigo
 
Dr G

Dr G

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Welcome, Crypt’. Nice assortment of horns. What’s up with the plastic bags on the necks?
 
CryptoHead

CryptoHead

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Welcome, Crypt’. Nice assortment of horns. What’s up with the plastic bags on the necks?
Hello Dr G,

It's protection so the cork grease does not dirty the case lining when put away.
Also, when I grease the cork, the plastic bag helps distribute the grease evenly all over the cork with out getting my hand all greased up.
Regards,

Rodrigo
 
Dr G

Dr G

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Northern California
Hello Dr G,

It's protection so the cork grease does not dirty the case lining when put away.
Also, when I grease the cork, the plastic bag helps distribute the grease evenly all over the cork with out getting my hand all greased up.
Regards,

Rodrigo

That’s an interesting approach, Rodrigo. I can see how it might work well, although I have never had an issue with the cork grease on my thumb. I actually like the feel of cork. Keeping the cork grease from the case lining is a great idea - and a great alternative to leaving the mouthpiece on the neck.
 
CryptoHead

CryptoHead

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Locality
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Hello Dr. G,

When I was buying old vintage saxes for rebuilding,
I often noticed the cork grease stains in the case lining where the neck sits.
That's when I realized I had a use for the small thick zip bags to protect the cork and the case.
SOP from then on.
Regards,

Rodrigo
 

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