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Part 3 - video on tumblr

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Visit my 'Tumblr' link below to see new video. Improved slightly. :)

Computer mic still terrible. So forgive me for that.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
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1,179
Hi Fi,
I've just had a look at the vid. and although it's difficult to see clearly, will make a couple of suggestions.
You might find it better to curl your bottom lip back over your teeth, so that it comes between the reed and your teeth (But don't bight up too hard).
You appear to be puffing your cheeks out when blowing. Try making your mouth into the shape as if you were saying "We". You will notice that the muscles in your cheeks have tensed up. This will be the first step towards a good embouchure.
Please forgive me if I haven't seen things clearly and you are already doing this ;}

John :);}
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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You might find it better to curl your bottom lip back over your teeth, so that it comes between the reed and your teeth (But don't bight up too hard).
I think most proper sax teachers would specifically advocate not doing this.

(proper = one who actually plays sax rather than a clarinettist who knows which end to blow in)

But there probably are as many acceptable embouchures as there are sax players.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
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1,179
I think most proper sax teachers would specifically advocate not doing this.

(proper = one who actually plays sax rather than a clarinettist who knows which end to blow in)

But there probably are as many acceptable embouchures as there are sax players.
A sign of the times?
It would help with control of the reed and help promote vibrato (that wonderful ingredient that makes the sax sing and people listen).
Developing a good sound is IMO, the biggest encouragement to continue with the sax.
Lip out, I think, is more suited to experienced players who have developed their ear.

John :);}
 

Wade Cornell

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Agree with Johnboy on this. I have seen/heard new players who couldn't get tone control until they tucked the lip in. One was a professional (jazz) flute player who is a fine musician. She was told to do the pouty lip thing and for a few years just couldn't manage any sort of decent tone, but certainly knew her way around the instrument.

The theory behind the pouty lip is to allow the reed to vibrate more freely, and it does work, but the difference is not enormous. I find that it lifts the volume slightly and opens up more high harmonics. As an "oldie" player they didn't teach this back when, but I was easily able to change/adapt. I use both positions depending on what I'm playing and the style.

From my observations it seems that it's easier to learn with a tucked lip then change/adapt once you've got your chops somewhat together. It's like learning to play a pipe organ if you don't already know how to play the piano. Yes there are foot pedals, but it is easier to ignore them until you've got your hands working. Trying to learn and apply everything at once can retard getting the basics of just playing.
 

MandyH

Sax-Mad fiend!
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just to clarify (and I'm no expert) but the lip doesn't need to be tucked in / over very far.
I was advised to try to visualise that if your bottom lip were transparent, you bottom teeth would be in line with the line that defines the edge of your lip (so the change from the red of your lip to the flesh of your chin).

I also read somewhere about imagining you were applying lip-stick (or lip-salve).. that's about as much in as your lip needs to be.

Oh and think about smiling, but not pulling the corners of your mouth up towards you eyes, but back towards your ear-lobes
 

BeBopSop

Member
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274
Just out of interest, Otto Langey, in his tuition book for the saxophone says,
'The lips must be drawn over the teeth to prevent them touching either the reed or the mouthpiece'
He also says
'Do not inflate the cheeks when forcing breath into the instrument,for the result is distorted features and bad tone'

statement no 1, I dont think I know of anyone who uses this method now, His book was written many years ago.
statement no. 2, still stands the test of time.

I find when I am playing (I was tought to roll the bottom lip over my teeth) now, I find it more comfortable and effective to unroll the lip ( I do this without noticing most of the time) and use a more 'pucker' lip position.



I think most proper sax teachers would specifically advocate not doing this.

(proper = one who actually plays sax rather than a clarinettist who knows which end to blow in)

But there probably are as many acceptable embouchures as there are sax players.
 
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BigMartin

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Otto Langey was (I believe) a 'cellist and wrote tutor books for every instrument under the sun.
 

BeBopSop

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Otto Langey was (I believe) a 'cellist and wrote tutor books for every instrument under the sun.
Otto Langey
Born in Germany, October 20, 1851.
He studied harmony, counterpoint, and composition, with Wilhelm Fritze. After several years of activity in England as a musical director and conductor, he came to the Untied States in 1889, and was appointed solo cellist with Bochert's Boston Symphony Club. Subsequently he settled in New York City. As a teacher of violoncello, and as an orchestral arranger he has attained wide distinction.
 

BigMartin

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Otto Langey
Born in Germany, October 20, 1851.
He studied harmony, counterpoint, and composition, with Wilhelm Fritze. After several years of activity in England as a musical director and conductor, he came to the Untied States in 1889, and was appointed solo cellist with Bochert's Boston Symphony Club. Subsequently he settled in New York City. As a teacher of violoncello, and as an orchestral arranger he has attained wide distinction.
Thanks for finding that. Not sure I'd set too much store by what he has to say about sax embouchure on tha basis of that CV, though.
 
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