Saxophones Painting Selmer S

The Lick

New Member
Messages
1
Location
Bay Area CA and Ithaca NY
#1
Hi Everyone!

I have been reading the forums here for a while but only just took the leap to make an account haha. I am a college student playing saxophone in the Jazz band, a combo and a few other groups and I play soprano - bass sax but mostly focus on alto and bari. I recently bought a Selmer Mark VII alto to replace the student horn I've had since 6th grade and I got one in beautiful condition from 1977 serial num: M274XXX with no engraving and no paint on the S located on the neck. I would love to paint the S in a color similar to the black/dark blue of the reference 54 necks but am not sure what the best way to go about it would be. I know that the paint doesn't make any difference to the sound and that it might be harder to resell due to not being "completely original" but I really like the look of it and would love to know your thoughts
 
Messages
103
Location
Canada
#2
I have no recommendations for your paint job but would like to offer a HUGE congratulations on joining and on your recent purchase. That’s a fine saxophone which I’m sure you’ll get years of enjoyment from. Good luck with your paint project.

Have fun.
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,267
Location
Surrey, UK
#4
I did just this on my Selmer Mk 7 tenor and made a mess of it.

In this country the right paint to use is, as @Pete Thomas suggests, Humbrol model paint and the colour is "French Blue" Humbrol AA0151 14 French Blue Gloss - 14ml Enamel Paint

I have a Selmer video tape of their manufacturing process and it shows how they make the neck, including applying paint to the "S" logo. I found a poor quality transfer of that video on YouTube that might give you some ideas. Their craftsmen make it look easy !


Rhys
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Cafe Moderator
Messages
11,694
Location
The Blue Ridge Mountains
#5
With any luck, model paint should be removable with paint stripper before the (presumably) much more resistant epoxy lacquer would get damaged.

ideally I think those umbral paints (or any oil based paint) would have an undercoat that is close to the actual colour as then you may get away with applying fewer coats of paint - most paint is slightly translucent.
 
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