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Accessories Pad lotion wanted.

Tommy Ng

Member
Messages
580
Hi

I have just got a YAS275 from ebay. The body is mint but all pads have got mould on them. The mould can be removed easily and the pads are not discoloured.

I have not played the sax yet as i don't want to poison myself, the mould is stink.

Just wonder if i need to apply something on those pads to rejuvinate them and to get rid of the odour.
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,483
I am afraid that this is a very difficult situation. Even if you get the pads cleaned outside the leather and felt underneath is now full of mold which will keep on coming back unless you use some very powerful stuff which will , almost certainly, damage the pads.

The worst , apparent, part is the smell. Once this has penetrated the pads there is no way that you can get rid of it. The least and more dangerous is that the mold could be dangerous.
http://moldblogger.com/7-ways-to-know-if-a-mold-is-dangerous/

In my view this calls for a repad job and a complete cleaning of the horn (in a bath!). You could try to apply some anti-mold stuff (generally high concentration bleach and other poisonous things) but remember that mould is the one of the toughest (and potentially most dangerous) things on earth .

I would definitely advise against it.
 
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Tommy Ng

Member
Messages
580
The seller is honest to say that there is not a single scratch on the sax ... but ... :=(

Seems like i need a repad and a shower ... Wonder how much it costs??
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,483
I don't know in the UK (I am assuming that you live there), here in Holland, I can have a complete repad of an alto for as little as 175€ up to 600€ depending on a number of things. If the horn is not in a bad nick , I could use one of the cheaper option because Yamahas tend to present little or no issues and it is a straight repad. Still worth it if you didn't pay too much for the horn. Not worth it if you are thinking of reselling it.
 

1954pip

Member
Messages
124
hi tommy ng
check out post having a sax serviced it tells you in there about cost of repad /service.
all best pip
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Last thing you want is a fungal lung infection....

Whole sax can go in th bath - but not with pads on - and if you do, they keys/rods must be dried and oiled afterwards. And you may need to replace any corks/bumpers that got wet.

Lighter fluid is good for a pad clean, but I don't think it'll get the spores out/killed. I tend to agree with Milandro/Pip. Pay someone to do it. The other alternative is to send it back as the seller should have pointed the mould out.
 

Little My

Practice makes better.
Messages
396
Pay someone to do it. The other alternative is to send it back as the seller should have pointed the mould out.
I agree with this, especially if the seller gave the impression that the sax was in near mint condition. If it was me I'd be asking for a partial refund to help cover the cost of a professional repad. If you paid by paypal you should be in quite a strong position, and you can always be honest with your feedback. I hope you can get this sorted, I know how hard it is to win a Yamaha sax on ebay.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
You can kill the mould with heat. Some types can also be killed by cold, although some just go dormant with cold. You could surface clean the pads, then, if you can get access to one, put the whole sax in an autoclave. Set the temperature at about 65 centigrade and it will kill the mould. If the autoclave does not have a variable setting, don't use it. The sort used in doctors and dentists usually run at 120 centigrade, which could cause a disaster.

You can also - and I can barely believe I'm even suggesting this - use a domestic electric oven, as long as it has a glass door. If you do this and it all goes wrong DON'T BLAME ME! You will need an oven you can trust and an accurate oven thermometer. Put the oven on, at as low a temperature as possible. Monitor it using the thermometer. When it gets to 65 centigrade, leave it along for half an hour. Check it is still at the same temperature. Wish yourself good luck and put the sax in. Leave the oven thermometer near the door so you can see it through the glass. Give it half an hour. Do not, under any circumstances, let it get any hotter than this, or all the shellac will melt and you'll definitely need a repad. Shellac melts at between about 75 and 120 depending on type. So don't let it get any hotter than 65 to allow a margin for error.

You'll probably need to re-oil the keywork as the heat may make the oil sticky.

If you do this, and it all goes well you'll kill the spores and it won't cost you anything. Get the heat too low, and you won't do any good. Get it too high and you'll have a disaster. It's the sort of thing I'd risk on an old knacker of a sax, but only then if I was very careful. On a YAS275? Maybe. Depends on how much you paid for it, the cost of a repad and what sort of condition the rest of the sax is in.

Is this the most lunatic suggestion for how to treat a sax in the whole history of time? Maybe.

Jon
 
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Tommy Ng

Member
Messages
580
You can kill the mould with heat. Some types can also be killed by cold, although some just go dormant with cold. You could surface clean the pads, then, if you can get access to one, put the whole sax in an autoclave. Set the temperature at about 65 centigrade and it will kill the mould. If the autoclave does not have a variable setting, don't use it. The sort used in doctors and dentists usually run at 120 centigrade, which could cause a disaster.

You can also - and I can barely believe I'm even suggesting this - use a domestic electric oven, as long as it has a glass door. If you do this and it all goes wrong DON'T BLAME ME! You will need an oven you can trust and an accurate oven thermometer. Put the oven on, at as low a temperature as possible. Monitor it using the thermometer. When it gets to 65 centigrade, leave it along for half an hour. Check it is still at the same temperature. Wish yourself good luck and put the sax in. Leave the oven thermometer near the door so you can see it through the glass. Give it half an hour. Do not, under any circumstances, let it get any hotter than this, or all the shellac will melt and you'll definitely need a repad. Shellac melts at between about 75 and 120 depending on type. So don't let it get any hotter than 65 to allow a margin for error.

You'll probably need to re-oil the keywork as the heat may make the oil sticky.

If you do this, and it all goes well you'll kill the spores and it won't cost you anything. Get the heat too low, and you won't do any good. Get it too high and you'll have a disaster. It's the sort of thing I'd risk on an old knacker of a sax, but only then if I was very careful. On a YAS275? Maybe. Depends on how much you paid for it, the cost of a repad and what sort of condition the rest of the sax is in.

Is this the most lunatic suggestion for how to treat a sax in the whole history of time? Maybe.

Jon
Sax Cooking :=)
 
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milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,483
the chance that you would damage your horn or make it less than playable with pads floating out of place (well ok, if you shut all the pads with clamps this might even be a good way to get the horn to seal well if it isn't.) is very much a reality even at such low temperatures. Moulds are the most resilient organisms on hearth and some of them would barely be deterred from developing again in no time, as soon as the conditions return to normal(which means as soon as you start playing!)
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
Actually, Milandro, almost all moulds are killed by heat, 60 degrees is enough to see them off. Whilst they can exist in a dormant state at very low temperatures, including in a deep freeze, they are killed by heat. I have effectively and permantly killed mould using a domestic dishwasher at a 65 degree setting, although not on a sax, as a dishwasher would certainly kill the sax as well as the mould!.

Still, cooking a sax is very much a last resort, really only for a sax it's not financially viable spending the cost of a repad. Your advice to get it repadded is, of course, absolutely the right thing to do.
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Not doubting the last resort method Jon, if carefully temperature controlled, but I can't get an alto in my oven :w00t:
YC
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
If you take all the eys off, then they'll easily go in the oven - but don't do this unless you know how to put it back together again...

I wouldn't think a hair dryer is going to give you the control or get hot enough
 
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