Ornette Coleman

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#2
His playing has always divided opinions.

some folks love him.................

others think of him as a finger waggling charlatan.....................

Im firmly in the 2nd camp, and have just never "got" what he is about.

Luckily, its each to their own in regards to music.
 

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#4
His playing has always divided opinions.

some folks love him.................

others think of him as a finger waggling charlatan.....................

Im firmly in the 2nd camp, and have just never "got" what he is about.

Luckily, its each to their own in regards to music.
I didn't get it when I first listened to him but thankfully I do now,
 

altissimo

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#6
it takes a while to get into Ornette. I wasn't sure at first, but the rhythm section were so good I knew there was something worthwhile going on. The Atlantic label albums were out of print when I was first getting into jazz in the late 70's, so had to manage with the Live At The Golden Circle albums on Blue Note that were all I could find in the library and an unofficial live recording called 'The Unprecedented Music Of Ornette Coleman' which has one of the few live recordings of 'Lonely Woman'
I recently read something on Facebook that said that Ornette and David 'Fathead; Newman used to practice Charlie Parker tunes back in their early years in Forth Worth and learnt all the solos, but Ornette would also improvise on those tunes in the style that he's known for now.
The only recordings of him playing anything close to bebop are rather rough and were recorded when he was playing with Paul Bley at The Hillcrest in LA - Bley drily remarked that you could tell when they were playing because all the regulars were standing outside..

 

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#7
it takes a while to get into Ornette. I wasn't sure at first, but the rhythm section were so good I knew there was something worthwhile going on. The Atlantic label albums were out of print when I was first getting into jazz in the late 70's, so had to manage with the Live At The Golden Circle albums on Blue Note that were all I could find in the library and an unofficial live recording called 'The Unprecedented Music Of Ornette Coleman' which has one of the few live recordings of 'Lonely Woman'
I recently read something on Facebook that said that Ornette and David 'Fathead; Newman used to practice Charlie Parker tunes back in their early years in Forth Worth and learnt all the solos, but Ornette would also improvise on those tunes in the style that he's known for now.
The only recordings of him playing anything close to bebop are rather rough and were recorded when he was playing with Paul Bley at The Hillcrest in LA - Bley drily remarked that you could tell when they were playing because all the regulars were standing outside..

The last track on the cd makes me think of Charlie Parker, i don't know why,, I think it's the riff, reminiscent of Bird and maybe he's referencing him somewhere
 

altissimo

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#12
The last track on the cd makes me think of Charlie Parker, i don't know why,, I think it's the riff, reminiscent of Bird and maybe he's referencing him somewhere
it all comes from Bird...
Ornette's one of the few sax players I've heard who could still be coming up with fresh ideas all the way through a solo. He had a few of his own pet phrases and mannerisms, like all great improvisers, but he didn't play cliches... Even Mingus who openly scorned Ornette admitted that he had something new to say - "the fact remains that his notes and lines are so fresh. So when Symphony Sid played his record, it made everything else he was playing, even my own record that he played, sound terrible. " - Blindfold Test | Charles Mingus: The Official Site
Miles also slagged off Ornette, but also sat in with him several times and tried to buy some compositions off him. You can hear the influence of Ornette in Mingus' and Miles' music in the 60's. Sonny Rollins, Coltrane and Jackie McLean were also admirers of Ornette's music.
more on the Ornette controversy here - in 1959: Ornette Coleman and The Battle of The Five Spot
 

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#17
it all comes from Bird...
Ornette's one of the few sax players I've heard who could still be coming up with fresh ideas all the way through a solo. He had a few of his own pet phrases and mannerisms, like all great improvisers, but he didn't play cliches... Even Mingus who openly scorned Ornette admitted that he had something new to say - "the fact remains that his notes and lines are so fresh. So when Symphony Sid played his record, it made everything else he was playing, even my own record that he played, sound terrible. " - Blindfold Test | Charles Mingus: The Official Site
Miles also slagged off Ornette, but also sat in with him several times and tried to buy some compositions off him. You can hear the influence of Ornette in Mingus' and Miles' music in the 60's. Sonny Rollins, Coltrane and Jackie McLean were also admirers of Ornette's music.
more on the Ornette controversy here - in 1959: Ornette Coleman and The Battle of The Five Spot
I believe they all slated Sun Ra
it all comes from Bird...
Ornette's one of the few sax players I've heard who could still be coming up with fresh ideas all the way through a solo. He had a few of his own pet phrases and mannerisms, like all great improvisers, but he didn't play cliches... Even Mingus who openly scorned Ornette admitted that he had something new to say - "the fact remains that his notes and lines are so fresh. So when Symphony Sid played his record, it made everything else he was playing, even my own record that he played, sound terrible. " - Blindfold Test | Charles Mingus: The Official Site
Miles also slagged off Ornette, but also sat in with him several times and tried to buy some compositions off him. You can hear the influence of Ornette in Mingus' and Miles' music in the 60's. Sonny Rollins, Coltrane and Jackie McLean were also admirers of Ornette's music.
more on the Ornette controversy here - in 1959: Ornette Coleman and The Battle of The Five Spot
I believe they all slated Sun Ra, Monk being one of the exceptions, he said he was a genius
 

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#18
it takes a while to get into Ornette. I wasn't sure at first, but the rhythm section were so good I knew there was something worthwhile going on. The Atlantic label albums were out of print when I was first getting into jazz in the late 70's, so had to manage with the Live At The Golden Circle albums on Blue Note that were all I could find in the library and an unofficial live recording called 'The Unprecedented Music Of Ornette Coleman' which has one of the few live recordings of 'Lonely Woman'
I recently read something on Facebook that said that Ornette and David 'Fathead; Newman used to practice Charlie Parker tunes back in their early years in Forth Worth and learnt all the solos, but Ornette would also improvise on those tunes in the style that he's known for now.
The only recordings of him playing anything close to bebop are rather rough and were recorded when he was playing with Paul Bley at The Hillcrest in LA - Bley drily remarked that you could tell when they were playing because all the regulars were standing outside..

He flies like a Bird
 

GCinCT

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#20
I listen to a wide variety of jazz. I like to hear what's gone before to help me develop. I do enjoy Ornette Coleman from time to time. I feel that perhaps Charlie Parker, had he survived, may have entered the same territory. Anyway, to each his own. We are fortunate to have so much music from which to choose.
 
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