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Jazz Once Around(Awesome Bari sax solo)

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
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4,474
Thanks for that.

Great band and great soloists as well as that lovel Pepper sound. We try to play a couple of Thad Jones - Mel Lewis charts in our big band, but they are really difficult.

Rhys

PS Time for me to get a low Bb bari ?
 

Chris

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Hi Rhys, Glad you like the clip. I only found it this afternoon. A jazz website sends me a couple of links every day. Every now and then something like this turns up. I will be having a look around for some more..

As for a Bb bari?? only if the GAS bites hard(hehe)

Chris
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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5,966
That's weird.

I'd flog him the Conn crossbar that I've got here - if it was mine to sell. I still can't work out why anyone likes them.

I'm taking it to a rehearsal in a minute, just to give myself a bit of hard work. I hate rehearsals when all you're doing is training up a new guitarist - definitely getting old and grumpy.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
That's weird.

I'd flog him the Conn crossbar that I've got here - if it was mine to sell. I still can't work out why anyone likes them.

I'm taking it to a rehearsal in a minute, just to give myself a bit of hard work. I hate rehearsals when all you're doing is training up a new guitarist - definitely getting old and grumpy.

Getting? :w00t:

John ;}
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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5,966
Getting? :w00t:

John ;}

Yes, alright - 'got' a while ago.

Drummer failed to turn up to rehearsal, which made things a little difficult. Conn behaved itself but, for some reason, made my left thumb ache. Sounded ok but generally is too much of a PITA to actually gig with it. I'll stick with the Yanag.
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,474
Why, if you've already got a low A one?

Pepper Adams played low Bb and so do many of my favourite baritone soloists. I really like my Selmer low A baritone but do find it gets pretty heavy to play for long periods standing up. When I have played a low Bb bari it feels more like a big tenor.

Here's a section of an interview with Pepper Adams from the Saxophone Journal Journal Vol. 9 No. 2 in May 1982 where he is talking about his saxophone.

The saxophone that I bought new in 1947 was still playing fine but getting rather delicate after having had a very hard life. With many people who own a baritone, it's their fifth saxophone, and it comes out of the closet once a month and therefore will last a good long time. Mine has been played every day for almost thirty-five years and has been over the world many times. Lord knows how many planes and trains and boats and buses it's been on. It still plays but was getting rather delicate, and I was afraid to travel with it much further. I was fortunate enough to have a full two weeks in Paris in December of 1980, and it was then that I contacted the Selmer people. I prefer playing the baritone without the low A, which is fairly uncommon now. I was shocked when they told me that the baritone without the low A accounts for only five percent of their world-wide sales. But, to me it's an instrument that speaks better, and generally the intonation is better. Certainly, the low A baritone tends to get stuffy on the bottom until you get to the low A.

Since I don't have to do much studio work, I can get away with playing the baritone without the low A. Anyway, the Selmer people were kind enough to send out telexes around France and assemble all nine of the baritones in France at that time without the low A. I took three days to test them all out. A couple of them I found had problems which could be repaired there by their repairmen, so I could return the next day and try them again after their repairmen had a crack at them. I was able to make my selection from all of those, which I think was exceptionally kind. I like the Selmer people very much; I was treated very nicely by their people and am quite happy with the instrument I have.


I hadn't heard about those Czech baritones that Pete mentioned - that just sounds silly.

Rhys
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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Well I suppose if you've been playing one for 35 years you might well prefer it. :)

I don't get the large tenor thing. It still feels just like a baritone and I don't really notice the weight difference.

Interesting that he should pick out the bottom as being different. Apart from Bb, of course, I don't hear a lot of difference in stuffiness. The only area where the Conn wins, I think, are the palm key notes. They speak more easily and have a tad more guts to them. Mind you, I've always had a few issues with the palm key notes on the Yanag, which were partly cured by opening up the upper octave hole a little. It may still benefit from a bit more - but I'm wary of buggering it up completely.

My favourite bari player at the moment plays the same set up I was using last night - Conn with a Berg. But that wouldn't induce me to change. Each to his own.
 
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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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I hadn't heard about those Czech baritones that Pete mentioned - that just sounds silly.

Rhys

Speculating, it may be a translation/language thing - remember the Czech instruments were made by Germans. And in German, musically, Bb is B, while B is H (confusing.... gets me every time). So a bari being keyed to low A would have the lowest notes C, H, B, A in German, equivalent to C, B, Bb, A in English, which then make sense if an English speaker dismissed the H as a typo or didn't notice it.
 
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