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Old Instrument Repair Manual

AndyWhiteford

Senior Member
Messages
454
some of that looks similar to the old "Selmer band instrument repair manual" I have from mid 1930's,
which I'd say was a great book on sax / brass / clarinet repair renovation. Nothing in it about violins, though.
Only problem with that old book is what's available from your local "chemist":
it's now a lot harder to buy, over the counter,
two gallons of sulphuric acid and a quart of cyanide solution.
I can't think why.....>:)
 

Ivan

Undecided
Subscriber
Messages
7,345
... what's available from your local "chemist":
it's now a lot harder to buy, over the counter...
I can't think why.....>:)
It still irks me that you can no longer buy saltpetre and flowers of sulphur from the chemist

As 'ealth and safety goes I s'pose it's not a great surprise that the general public isn't permitted to stockpile the ingredients for gunpowder, but I think it's a shame in a way that teenagers can't experience the fun of making incendiary devices and of managing the risk of losing eye or limb in the process
 

spike

Old Indian
Messages
2,261
LOL Ivan - that brings back memories, when I was 6 or 7 seven years old we used to buy that stuff in a brown paper bag at the local hardware store for a penny or two, then we'd drop it down the grids after it rained, drop a match in and wait for the BOOOOOM!! What a larf. Brings tears to my eyes, oh deary me. Those were the days.
 

Greg Strange

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,077
Looks like an edition of the Eric Brand Wind Instrument Manual that Selmer (Andy is correct) put out.

I purchased my copy from Ferres Tool in the States. My copy has a picture of Selmer Balanced Action alto which puts it around the late 1930s.

The manual was always recommended by the 'Sax Doctor' Emilio Lyons in his repair segment in Saxophone Journal as the "Bible" of wind instrument repair.

Cheers and happy last day of the world...it's 8.21 a.m. on the 21st of December 2012 and I'm still here...:)))

Greg S.
 
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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Looks like an edition of the Eric Brand Wind Instrument Manual that Selmer (Andy is correct) put out.

I purchased my copy from Ferres Tool in the States. My copy has a picture of Selmer Balanced Action alto which puts it around the late 1930s.

The manual was always recommended by the 'Sax Doctor' Emilio Lyons in his repair segment in Saxophone Journal as the "Bible" of wind instrument repair.

Cheers and happy last day of the world...it's 8.21 a.m. on the 21st of December 2012 and I'm still here...:)))

Greg S.
You're just ahead of us. Let us all know if you make it to the 22nd:thumb:
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
8,011
Thanks for the clarification that this is the old Eric Brand Band Instrument Repair Manual. The following quote is from a discussion of saxophone makes and models on page 70.

If ever there were changes made on saxophones, the Holton Company made them. What would normally seem to be changes for the better. made this saxophone in the past seem like a farce. The high Eb trill key put out by the Holton Company with the advent of their Rudy Weidoft Model was a museum piece. Their attempt of clarification of the middle D by the insertion of the C auxiliary tone hole was. without question, the worst key arrangement that could possibly be conceived by the minds of men. Their G# trill lever was, without any doubt, one of the biggest mistakes ever made by any saxophone company. The insertion of an extremely long rod to hold the Eb trill lever and the high E key was undoubtedly a horrible mistake in saxophone planning. However, the more recent Holton instrument, although it cannot be considered among the finest in the professional field, has made such fine improvements that it ranges as one of the top instruments for the amateur student lines.
Too bad Erick Brand didn't quit beating around the bush and come out and tell us how he really felt about the Rudy Weidoft model. ;} There is still loads of information in that book that is as accurate and useful as it was when the book was written over 60 years ago.
 
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Greg Strange

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,077
You're just ahead of us. Let us all know if you make it to the 22nd:thumb:
No problems Kev...

I'll be pretty p!ssed off if it is the end of the world ...I'm starting my summer holidays - last day of work today 23 days straight of no work...nothing like a Kiwi summer...:)

pauanui.jpg

Choice bro!

Happy Festive Season and New Year

Greg S.
 
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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
cold, wet and mis here. Snow's gone, but close to freezing when we got back from my wife's concert. Hope you get your hols, otherwise we'll all be ticked off...
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
8,011
(Back to the topic---sorry) This thread sparked my interest and I have done a bit of research which I love to do. The book linked to above was first published in 1939 by H.&A. Selmer Elkhart, IN under the title "Selmer Band Instrument Repairing Manual". There was a 2nd printing in 1942 which continued through 1946. In 1947 the book was re-published by Auburn Printing Co. under the title "Band Instrument Repairing Manual"---dropping the name "Selmer" from the beginning. A revised 7th edition was issued by a publisher in Elkhart, IN in 1976. This revised edition was reprinted by Ferree's Tools beginning in 1993 and continues through the present.

Something that caught my interest and that ties this all together is the fact that Erick D. Brand was Selmer's shop manager for many years. He also wrote a book entitled "Selmer Repairing Secrets" in 1936. There are only 2 known copies in the U.S., both at university libraries. I am currently working on getting access to this work through a local university library.
 

Ermelindo Arroyo

New Member
Messages
9
What do you mean with "revised edition"? Was it updated to include more modern tools and exclude illegal or banned materials such as asbestos? Or was it just re-printed. Not sure what is meant here with "revised edition"!
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
8,011
What do you mean with "revised edition"? Was it updated to include more modern tools and exclude illegal or banned materials such as asbestos? Or was it just re-printed. Not sure what is meant here with "revised edition"!
Good question. I went back to the Ferree's catalog and it says, "This manual has been faithfully reprinted since 1993, to help newcomers". Calling it "revised" is incorrect. I apologize for my mistake.

Now for some important information with regard to this thread. The work that is linked to in the initial post is not "The Band Instrument Repairing Manual by Erick Brand". I can state this for a fact because I have the original hardcover book it was copied from sitting on my desk. The repair manual made available in pdf format on the internet is "The Encyclopedia of Band Instrument Repair" by Frederick Kirschner published in 1962 by Music Trade Review, Inc. New York. The copy I have is on loan from the Public Library of Des Moines, Iowa---one of two copies known to be in libraries across the U.S. It is cool the way the basic fundamentals of instrument repair have not changed in over 50 years. Both Brand and Kirschner were geniuses in their trade.
 

Ermelindo Arroyo

New Member
Messages
9
Good question. I went back to the Ferree's catalog and it says, "This manual has been faithfully reprinted since 1993, to help newcomers". Calling it "revised" is incorrect. I apologize for my mistake.

Now for some important information with regard to this thread. The work that is linked to in the initial post is not "The Band Instrument Repairing Manual by Erick Brand". I can state this for a fact because I have the original hardcover book it was copied from sitting on my desk. The repair manual made available in pdf format on the internet is "The Encyclopedia of Band Instrument Repair" by Frederick Kirschner published in 1962 by Music Trade Review, Inc. New York. The copy I have is on loan from the Public Library of Des Moines, Iowa---one of two copies known to be in libraries across the U.S. It is cool the way the basic fundamentals of instrument repair have not changed in over 50 years. Both Brand and Kirschner were geniuses in their trade.
Thanks for the info, would it make sense for me to buy The Band Instrument Repairing Manual by Erick Brand, seeing as I have a copy of the Kirschner's manual? Or just use the money to buy needed tools?
 

Jazzthing

New Member
Messages
1
No idea where I found this - may be of interest to the Caff members, contains sections on brass, woodwind, drums and violins. Appears to be about fifty years old. Downloadable as pdf here

http://www.thesax.de/Instrument_Repair_Manual.pdf

gruss - spike

Hi. I tried to download the file but it does not exist anymore. I really would be interested in a copy . Could you send me a download by any chance por favour? Best regards, Elliott Friedland
 
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