All profit supporting special needs music education and Help Musicians
SYOS

Octave key trouble on BW sop

flamingoer

Member
Messages
138
Morning all

My straight bronze soprano is a thing of beauty and sounds warm and loveable but -

for the first few minutes of playing it won't play above A2. I thought it must be me but

took it to my teacher and she had exactly the same problem. After about five or ten minutes

of scales etc. it suddenly kicks in. Neither of us could find any physical reason for this.

Any recognition, or helpful thoughts would be gratefully received. (I don't want to have

to send it back to WWB)
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
When it's cold check the octave key transition betwent eh pips (body/neck) when you finger the FGA sequence. Could be something tight/bent, or sticky pad, weak spring or something else. Chances are it'll have to go to a technician.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
Also look at the cork on the arm for the body octave tube. If it sticks to the arm (mine did) it will stop it opening properly. Slip a bit of fag paper over the cork and see if the problem goes away.
 

flamingoer

Member
Messages
138
Very grateful for the suggestions.
As gently as poss, I've pushed,prodded and polished
everything in sight in the octave key area.
Seems to have done the trick - for today anyway!

Fingers crossed. Thanks again
 

flamingoer

Member
Messages
138
Spoke too soon. Intermittent problem returns.
However have just discovered small loose rectangular piece of cork
measuring about 5/8 x 1/4 " which might have been gumming up the works.
Unfortunately haven't got a clue where it belongs.

Still for the moment it sounds OK.
Further installments to follow....maybe.
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,939
There are generally three pieces of cork fitted to the octave key mech.
One sits under the octave touchpiece arm which connects to the octave key mechanism itself. Another sits underneath the arm that the pin's connected to (which stick up over the crook socket) - the other piece is fitted the to the G key foot.

It sounds to me like you might have a sticking pad. It's quite common, especially on sopranos. Try degreasing both the body and the crook octave key pads.
Check the corks too - a missing one probably wouldn't stop the mech from working, but you'd notice a clunking noise.

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/HandyHints/stickypads.htm

Regards,
 

flamingoer

Member
Messages
138
Thanks Stephen,

I've checked pads etc. I think the errant cork must have jammed the mechanism
and was pushed arround to free itself after a few minutes playing.
So far I'm not aware of any clunks and can't see any obviously cork-free spots.

Thanks again for your help.
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,939
I suspect the cork comes from the low C# lever. There's a bar that connects with the low C# key cup and sits over a pin with a plastic tube fitted to it. There's often a piece of cork on the lever key arm - which usually drops off. It isn't important and its not being there will only result in the C# touchpiece being a fraction higher than before.

Regards,
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
BW Curved Soprano problem - the lower G is sounding very muffled - every other note seems fine but that. Any ideas as to what might have happened since yesterday - all was fine, and I've left it overnight on my K&M stand.

Odd.......

Any help appreciated
Tom
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,939
Check the piece of cork that sits under the A key arm (over the Bis Bb key cup).
If this falls off (as it sometimes does) it will knacker the A and the G.
As you play F you bring the Bis Bb link into play from the aux.F key link, thus closing the leak...so all notes down from F play fine.
Check the operation of the G# key too - is the G# key cup closing? Give it a little tap.
If the mech has been damaged it might be holding open...and relying on the aux.F key bar to close it for the lower notes.

Regards,
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi Steve!

Yes, I'd noticed that the G# pad was open when playing the G and had a little fiddle to see whether I could improve it by adjusting the G# key. I will take it to a local tech - the whole key block seems a little in need of adjustment and don't want to cause any mayhem.

Cheers Steve
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,939
A get-you-out-of-trouble fix would be to wrap a bit of tape around the G# lever arm.
If you have a look at the G# key (about halfway down) in this review:

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Reviews/Saxes/Tenor/Unison_Goodson_tenor.htm

...you'll see the bar I mean...this one's fitted with a flat spring. Wrap the tape around this arm so that it acts like a piece of cork fitted to the underside of the arm. You don't have to be too spot on with the thickness, just as long as it's thick enough to prevent the G# key cup opening.
A tech will easily be able to sort it out - it's either just a bit of cork, or the bell key spatulas have copped a whack.
You could try to bend the key, but as it's a Chinese horn you'll probably give yourself a hernia before the key bends.

Regards,
 

flamingoer

Member
Messages
138
You are, of course, absolutely correct, so no suprises there! - the lower C# arm it is.
Am reaching for the tube of glue straight after once more saying many thanks.

no excuses for not sounding like Garbarek any more.
 

flamingoer

Member
Messages
138
I suspect the cork comes from the low C# lever. There's a bar that connects with the low C# key cup and sits over a pin with a plastic tube fitted to it. There's often a piece of cork on the lever key arm - which usually drops off. It isn't important and its not being there will only result in the C# touchpiece being a fraction higher than before.

Regards,
You are, of course, quite correct, so no suprises there!
The lower C# arm it is.
Once again many thanks. Am reaching for the glue tube any moment now.
 
Saxholder Pro
Help!Mailing List
Top Bottom