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Saxophones Now I am a sequoia endorser

aldevis

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I finally received the tenor that I decided to endorse: "Sequoia".


a- Why I decided to endorse it:
1- The one of the two owners that I met, Mr. Buttus. Is mainly a repairer with a past as a professional musician: he knows his stuff.
2- I tried the instrument out of curiosity, and I fell in love with it immediately. I didn't buy it straight away only because I needed time to compare it with my other horns.
3- They have the worst marketing possible: it means you pay for the saxophone, not for the ads (non existing)
4- The guy is really funny and he comes from a peculiar area (Friuli) where they are so unlucky that they don't have the word "happy" in their language (only a neologism, borrowed from Italian). Their best culinary achievement is an imitation of sauerkraut (this is all true), but they generally have a quite strong working ethos.
5- It is exactly the instrument I need: flexible, professional, relatively cheap (comparable in price with YTS 280/480).
6- Very little information about the brand on the internet.
7- They deserve to be seen on this side of the Channel.


b- About the brand
1- Mr Buttus and Mr Jansen are the owners. They are both repairers (I have seen Buttus working very well in his workshop). One lives in Belgium, one in Italy.
2- Instruments are made in Taiwan under original designs. They are not stencils. Parts of the keywork can be common to other brands, but the main body is exclusive and original. Staff at the factory is regularly trained by them.
3- They claim they do the tone hole drawing personally, in Taiwan, setting the main bodies for the whole production (not many horns an year, though).
4- They are both unable to market their products. Apparently in Germany and Belgium they sell slightly better than Italy (I found some German reviews).


c- About my specific horn
As you can guess, it was like being in toyland. I could just pick up the one I liked more among a dozen tenors, but I have been good: I picked up the one that goes noticed.
1- It is the unlacquered model, with lacquered keywork. I feel It plays better than the basic lacquered (that is the real bargain), but not such a huge difference. Lacquered keywork is actually a very smart choice to prevent wear.
2- It is sold with two necks, to be chosen among yellow brass, rose brass, silver plated. I have all three of them, will report later.
3- It has no high F#! He only had two specimens like this. They sound almost exactly like the ones with high F#, but they get noticed.
4- The model has a name unsuitable for the English speaking market, so I need to find an alternative. Any help is welcome. "Sequoia Citron" is the best I could come with.
5- It is a tenor, because there is a bigger market, but they soprano is really incredible.


d- Where to buy
We don't know yet. I hope find some interest from some shops in the UK. They are trying to keep a fixed price policy all over Europe.
Hopefully his own online shop will be setup shortly, but to opportunity of trying thew would boost the business.


I am happy to answer to any question, meet any possible shop/distributor, give any good advice if you decide to fly to Friuli Venezia-Giulia (hire a car and you can experience almost everything: sea, mountains, history, food, wine, culture, 5 different languages in a 50 miles radius...).


Hopefully sound clips will follow.
 
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breathless

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270
Aldevis, a very interesting thread and it will be interesting to see them break into the market of which I'm sure is overun with different manufacturers, however quality will always win threw. there's a lot of weight behind a good name but that good name is only achieved by producing a good item and good service.

Talking of names, Sequioa citron??? Sorry but sounds like yet another un-impressive small shopping car! Even more so if you flip the order of the names!

Rgds Lee.
 

aldevis

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Aldevis, a very interesting thread and it will be interesting to see them break into the market of which I'm sure is overun with different manufacturers, however quality will always win threw. there's a lot of weight behind a good name but that good name is only achieved by producing a good item and good service.
Actually most brands we see come from the same factories. I am happy to see some original ideas, by two repairers trying to achieve a sound.

Talking of names, Sequioa citron??? Sorry but sounds like yet another un-impressive small shopping car! Even more so if you flip the order of the names!
You should see the original name... Unthinkable here.
 

RMorgan

Member
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110
Hey mate,

That´s pretty nice!

I´m really curious to see some pictures and listen to some sound clips. :)

Well, I think "Citron" is not good for naming a sax...It looks like a car name, in my opinion.

Maybe, since the brand is Sequoia, you should name different saxophones like different species of Sequoia trees, like Sequoia magnifica, Sequoia sempervirens, Sequoiadendron giganteum, etc... You don´t have to follow these names, but you might use them as inspiration.

Cheers,

Raf.
 

aldevis

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"Sequoia Citron"

Redwood Lemon?????
Almost: Sequoia Lemon.
It is like having the exclusive Toyota Rubbish or riding the new Honda Snail.

This is one of the problems about translations, like the old song "my cat fell in the well"
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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I wouldn't translate it. Sequoia is distinctive and has nice connotations. But citron... too car like. Just Sequoia for me.
 

Wade Cornell

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As RMorgan said Sequoia is a tree which comes from California, but botanical names aren't particularly sexy. Just happens that my day job is as a forest research and one of the main trees I work with is Sequoia. The name comes from an North American Indian Chief, and to me sounds appropriate. I don't know if they would want to use a USA sort of western theme, but that might be appropriate. One could ask: what does a horn made in Taiwan designed by an Italian and Belgian have to do with the American West? I guess there are lots of examples of this sort of thing that we routinely ignore.

The horn has been out for a while, but as said not well promoted. The people I've heard talk about it had only good things to say, so hopefully its star will eventually rise based on reputation. In the meanwhile here are a few thoughts about names, but if you wind up using any of them I would expect a BIG discount on a horn purchase as thanks.

Based on the western theme:
Tenor: Klondike, Grizzly, Montana, Wyoming, Phoenix, Mojave, Colorado, Eldorado
Alto: Aspen, Kiva, Wind Walker, Eagle, Brave, Vista
Soprano: Hummingbird, Lark, Lynx, Nightingale, Chaparral
I guess the same exercise could be used for any other “theme”. If you want to continue this exercise using other themes send me a P.M.

From what I understand you’re promoting a pretty good instrument. Take your time and brand these well so that you wind up with a name that people remember and have a positive identification with.
 

visionari1

Senior Member
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1,581


Here's a great name for hand lotion.... Maybe the same logic should be used for naming this multi national saxophone brand/ model.


Cheers & ciao
Jimu

"Together We Create Beauty"
 

Greg Strange

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,077
Congratulations on your endorsement.

One way to get the horn out in the public arena might be to sent a sax to Steve Howard for a review.

I believe Steve does a fair review of an instrument starting with the build quality of the instrument and finishing up with comments about the tone, etc which is probably more subjective and down to the individual.

Posting a few videos on YouTube might help spread the word.

Nowadays every issue I pick up of DownBeat magazine there appears to another new saxophone manufacturer unveiling the latest horn - full page advertisement, famous pro player endorsing the horn. Funny thing a lot of these saxes alway seem to resemble the Selmer (Paris) Super Action 80 Series II. Why not a Conn 10M, 6M, with modern keywork?

It's a very competitive market place with all the makers old and new fighting for the saxophonic dollar, pound, shekel, euro, yen, etc.

Good luck with the sax and the venture.

Regards,

Greg S.
 

aldevis

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Congratulations on your endorsement.

One way to get the horn out in the public arena might be to sent a sax to Steve Howard for a review.

Posting a few videos on YouTube might help spread the word.
It's a very competitive market place with all the makers old and new fighting for the saxophonic dollar, pound, shekel, euro, yen, etc.
Good advice, I thought too of contacting Mr. Howard.
About youtube... I am a bit skeptical about videos: in most of the existing videos about instruments/mouthpieces (some sequoia already there) the conversion quality does not allow you to understand the actual sound. I will probably have to use my website linked with soundcloud.

I wouldn't translate it. Sequoia is distinctive and has nice connotations. But citron... too car like. Just Sequoia for me.
Ok, I probably have been confusing: Sequoia is the name of the brand, and is discretely engraved on the bell. They make four models called: lacquer, silver, lemon and booster.
If I say that I chose the lemon, it doesn't sound right, hence the need for an alternative name.

BTW, I need to ask, since I always assumed that "sequoia" referred to the Chief, rather than the tree (named after Chief Sequoia).

My first two hours of playing have been big fun, messing around with necks and mouthpieces. Looking forward to go tonight to the Yanagisawa jam, to see how it behaves in an unforgiving live environment.

Some pictures on this Slovenian website
http://www.vincero.si/en/saksofoni/tenor/
 
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old git

Tremendous Bore
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5,545
Our Information Kiosk is branded "Sequoia".

Al's sounds much better. His works.
 

MMM

Senior Member
Messages
911
How about "Blond" (free marketing catchphrase: "why not take a "Blond" to your next gig!")or maybe a shade of yellow? You could pick one from an artist's shop palette...

They sound like very interesting saxes, at the right price, they will only have to compete with :TJ Raw, Howarth's Chiltern, RawBrass, Walstein Pro, System 54, etc.
Do they make a bari?

Cheers,
M.
 

MMM

Senior Member
Messages
911
Funny thing a lot of these saxes alway seem to resemble the Selmer (Paris) Super Action 80 Series II. Why not a Conn 10M, 6M, with modern keywork?
Slightly OT, but I thought that's exactly what Borgani and Rampone set out to do...
M.
 

MMM

Senior Member
Messages
911
Sorry, last thing and then I'll shut up (promise!): why not organise a "pass around" within the Forum, I would be the first interested to try one out!
If they're as good as you say (and I'm not doubting you!), I bet you, you would get quite a few sales off the back of it!
M.
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
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12,125
How about "Blond" (free marketing catchphrase: "why not take a "Blond" to your next gig!")or maybe a shade of yellow? You could pick one from an artist's shop palette...

Do they make a bari?
Sequoia Tenor Blond
Sequoia Blond Tenor
Sequoia Tenor Natural Blond
Sequoia Shandy

Opinions? More ideas from British indigenous?

They make a bari. I only play few notes on it and loved it, but I didn't try it extensively like tenor and soprano.


Sorry, last thing and then I'll shut up (promise!): why not organise a "pass around" within the Forum, I would be the first interested to try one out!
If they're as good as you say (and I'm not doubting you!), I bet you, you would get quite a few sales off the back of it!
M.
A pass around would be a bit complicated, since it is going to be my only tenor for a few (it is in the endorsement agreement), but i am happy to organize some meetings.

Where? When is next "whatreeds U use" party? We should organize one.

I would like to point out that I will not get a commission from any sale: simply some special treatment (like spending hours in the workshop annoying Mr. Buttus). My first aim is still to find a distributor for the UK, and I will take the long way, playing my saxophone around.

In the meantime I am playing it a lot.
The different necks behave differently with different mouthpieces. At the moment Link 11 on copper neck and Pillinger NYT9 on brass neck are the winning combinations.

The thing is really yellow. It is supposed to oxidize, I hope soon. It looks too new for my taste.
 
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tzadik

Member
Messages
356
Here it is the "Lemon":



(I'm a happy Sequoia Lemon tenor owner too).
----
An important thing I want to point up:
The tenor models are five: lacquered, unlacquered (="Lemon", "Lemon" is unhappy name also in Italian), Silver (silver plated), Booster (with a glass-like finish, the "old Boosted" had a simple matte finish), Red Booster.

The "lacquered" and the "Silver" are basically the same horn, but different finish.
The "unlacquered"body is been differently treated... so it's not a lacquered/silver with no lacquer... the process to make it is different and the horn plays much different from the first two.

The Booster and the Red Booster are made in different alloys (each other and from the other three).
They have a certain percentage of nickel in the alloy (the Red Booster has more nickel inside than the Booster)... but they are not made in nickel silver (luckily).
They very fast instruments... they have something unique inside because there are no horns like these on the market.
There are many horns made in nickel silver... but they are "extreme" horn. The "Red Booster" can be extreme, but not as extreme as some nickel silver unlacquered horn.
The "Booster" is pretty versatile horn, very easy to play, compact and harmonic sound.

---
For the altos there is another model, called K85 (lacquered), which is made in rose brass (85% of copper in the alloy)... all the horn, not only the neck.
For the sopranos, there is a model called K91 (lacquered), which is made in brass with 91% of copper in the alloy. There are Booster/Red Booster for the soprano... there no more "lacquered" soprano (in yellow brass), but only the K91.
 
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tzadik

Member
Messages
356
He comes from a peculiar area (Friuli) where they are so unlucky that they don't have the word "happy" in their language (only a neologism, borrowed from Italian). Their best culinary achievement is an imitation of sauerkraut (this is all true), but they generally have a quite strong working ethos.
Aldevis, you came from Friuli too. :D

We also don't have a word for "to love" and for "wife" but we made wonderful wine, excellent beers.. and other interesting stuff.

I am happy to answer to any question, meet any possible shop/distributor, give any good advice if you decide to fly to Friuli Venezia-Giulia (hire a car and you can experience almost everything: sea, mountains, history, food, wine, culture, 5 different languages in a 50 miles radius...).
If someone wants to buy without, I think it's already possible... but buy before trying is preferred.

These horns are worth much than they cost... this due the absense of marketing.
The "unlacquered" is priced EUR 1650 (with one neck) or EUR 1900 (with two necks).
EUR 1650 = GBP 1322
EUR 1900 = GBP 1522
Shipping in Europe can be about EUR 50/60 = GBP 40/48.

The "lacquered" is priced EUR 1450 = GBP 1162... and comes with a red brass neck (K85): very traditional horn, warm sounding, very even sound. It can compete and beat many traditional professional lacquered horns (Serie II/III, Yana 991, Yamaha 62/82Z).
 
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