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New Neck ‘How to make it fit?’

Two Voices

Senior Member
Messages
1,113
I have just got a Yani A901 Alto Sax and it was set-up great – the supplied neck comes in and out with ease. At the same time I purchased a 92 neck and although it fits it is a little on the tight side. So I’d like to make it fit better. I was thinking using wet and dry (dry) at around 320 or 400 grit. Would this be okay? Is it the right way to do this?

Many thanks,

Paul
 

Taz

Busking Oracle
Messages
3,662
Paul, personaly I wouldn't recomend sanding it, have you tried a little cork grease on the joint? I find this is normaly enough.
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
Subscriber
Messages
5,953
Tight is good. For heaven's sake don't sand it. Wot Taz said - a tiny amount of grease.
 

Two Voices

Senior Member
Messages
1,113
Thanks for the replies guys! Unfortunately the last 1/4" is really tight, so tight that it won't swivel at all even with a dab of cork crease on it. So I have to line it up then push it in that last 1/4". Maybe it'll wear as I pull it in and out over the next few weeks.
 

AndyG

Member
Messages
324
I agree with cork grease. The neck on my Bauhaus is a tight fit but I prefer it that way as if anything, the one on my last sax was a little loose. A little cork grease every now and then does the job and its getting a little easier now.
 

Two Voices

Senior Member
Messages
1,113
I agree with cork grease. The neck on my Bauhaus is a tight fit but I prefer it that way as if anything, the one on my last sax was a little loose. A little cork grease every now and then does the job and its getting a little easier now.
Thanks Andy! Might see how it goes or I might get a Sax Tech to look at it if the postage isn't too great!
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Take the locking screw out, and isert a small screwdriver into the locking slot. "GENTLY" tap the screwdriver so that it expands the slot, remove screwdriver and try fitting the neck. keep doing this until it fits. Simples Tttch!!!!!

John.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Take the locking screw out, and isert a small screwdriver into the locking slot. "GENTLY" tap the screwdriver so that it expands the slot, remove screwdriver and try fitting the neck. keep doing this until it fits. Simples Tttch!!!!!

John.
This will work if the new neck is a little big at the top, but if the socket is tight at the bottom, it won't. Other problem with this is that the old neck will be loose, so you tighten the screw up, and when you come to use the new neck again, the socket is too tight. Better to take both necks and the sax to a technician.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Alternative method:-

Go to your local ships chandlers, and get a tapered wooden bung (they have various sizes), remove locking screw and "GENTLY" tap the bung into the body to expand it.

John.
 
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johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Kev, I doubt very much that the few thou required to expand the body, would close up again when the screw is tightened. I'm sure it will spring open again.
A Tech would probably use the something similar to the second method (that should bring one in);}

John.
 

griff136

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,048
I wouldnt put any grease on the tenon as once its off the sax and in the case the grease will pick up microscopic pieces of fluff from the case or dust or other foreign bodies and then will act as a grinding paste in the tenon - ever seen a neck tenon with scratches on it? that's caused by a dirty reciever /tenon.

I wouldnt open up the slot either.

Your best bet is to :

a. clean the tenon and the receiver thoroughly - I use 0000 grade wire wool- and then clean off with meths on a cloth. be careful to mask the laquered side of the shoulder on the new crook. Remove the crook key first.

b. Take it to your tech who will most probably have tenon shrinking tools and the other associated equipment to get both your necks fitting snug when they're dry ( just think of the feel and sound a new yamaha or yanigasawa crook makes when it slides effortlessly into its receiver.)
 
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johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Sorry, in my second reply I said wooden wedge. What I meant to say, and I've altered it now, is a tapered circular wooden bung, that will expand the receiver diameter. Available from chandlers.

John.
 

griff136

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,048
I wouldnt put anything in the receiver to expand it - particularly as the original crook fits nicely. clean the tenon and receiver and see if that makes any difference.
You could also try cleaning both with some brasso as this is less abrasive than emery/wet or dry paper. make sure you clean all parts thoroughly afterwards.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Hi Paul,
Sorry if I was a little incoherent in last nights posts I was rushing about getting ready for a gig (I shouldn't have been on here!).
The first thing you need to know, is what's the problem, is it the neck sleeve, or the neck socket.
Take the sax to an engineering company and get it checked dimensionally. They will use a micrometer to check the neck for taper and ovality. The neck socket will be checked for the same thing, using a spring gauge and micrometer. In five minutes you will have your answer. If you do anything yourself, you may invalidate the guarantee. Exchange a faulty item!!!!!!

John.
 

MartinL

Member
Messages
366
Hold on a bit, lets assume that the old neck is a good fit and may be required to fit again in the future. It would be fairly easy to open up the sax socket in the ways already quoted but hell DONT.. or the old neck will fit like a "turd in a bucket", (excuse my engineering terms). The item here that needs attention is the new neck and all it needs is careful and skillful "fitting", ie reducing with fine emery or grinding paste until correct. For gods sake don't change the original setup of the sax unless you want to sling the standard neck in the dustbin.

If you're not confident doing this then ask an engineer or saxtech.
 
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johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
This is new kit, poorly manufactured, if it ain't right, it should be slung back at the manufacturer, or are we going to be prepared to put up with sub-standard gear???

John.
 
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rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,390
This is new kit, poorly manufactured, if it ain't right, it should be slung back at the manufacturer, or are we going to be prepared to put up with sub-standard gear???

John.
That's just not right. If you want to get cross about something, it shouldn't be this ! Manufacturing tolerances can't be zero for every single item, but the original neck is a good fit and it's an easy and standard job for a tech to adjust the second neck.

We are looking for a really precise fit, good to within about a thou' (0.001") and perfectly round to ensure a decent seal. It is a straightforward task for a repair tech to adjust the neck and/or the socket to give the necessary quality of fit - should just take a couple of minutes.

As others have said, don't adjust the socket if you want both necks to fits perfectly.

I have got some necks that are too tight and you can actually see the high spots on the tenon (Steve Howard's book calls it the neck sleeve). It should be possible to take them down with very fine grit paper, but you really want to ensure that no grit or debris is left. Make certain it's clean before trying the joint again.

Rhys
 

Two Voices

Senior Member
Messages
1,113
Thank-you all very much for your replies, very much appreciated!

Just to clarify. The original neck that came with the sax glides in and out like a dream and I wish to continue using this neck to obtain a certain sound. The 92 Brass Neck was bought separately and is indeed a snug fit at the top. It goes in very easily until the last 1/4” then it is really super tight. I’m going to try Griff’s suggestion of using 0000 grade wire wool and then clean off with meths. It should work a treat as it’s probably less than a thou to come off.

Looking at the neck that came with the sax that was fully set-up prior to despatch it would appear that this method was used rather than fine grit paper.

I’ll let you know how I get on once I’ve got some 0000 Wire Wool and Meths!
 

Two Voices

Senior Member
Messages
1,113
Hi Paul,
Sorry if I was a little incoherent in last nights posts I was rushing about getting ready for a gig (I shouldn't have been on here!).
The first thing you need to know, is what's the problem, is it the neck sleeve, or the neck socket.
Take the sax to an engineering company and get it checked dimensionally. They will use a micrometer to check the neck for taper and ovality. The neck socket will be checked for the same thing, using a spring gauge and micrometer. In five minutes you will have your answer. If you do anything yourself, you may invalidate the guarantee. Exchange a faulty item!!!!!!

John.
No worries John! It must be the hormones :))) Sorry mate couldn't resist!

The item isn't faulty just needs a minor adjustment to make it work efficiently.
 

griff136

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,048
Paul, be sure to mask off the laquered area of the tenon otherwise the wire wool will scratch the lacquer.

let us know howyou get on.
 
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