New article: How much mouthpiece to take in?

GJ77

Senior Member
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615
Location
Dunmow, Essex.
Ok, here's what I tell my students (I think it's the Larry Teal method but can't quite remember where I read it all those years ago):

1. Take a piece of paper and slide it between reed and mouthpiece.

2. At the point where the paper meets firm resistance (the meeting point between reed and mouthpiece), make a pencil mark on the bottom of the reed.

3. Place your thumb on the reed with your nail facing back towards you and positioned perfectly on the line that you drew.

4. Put your bottom lip there.

While I realise that I tend to move about quite a lot on the piece for different tones/effects etc, I always find this to be a good starting point and a clear way to explain it to students. It makes sense logically aswell.

Glen
 
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Pete Thomas

Pete Thomas

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The Blue Ridge Mountains
Yes, that is what I read in larry Teal. I think Teal says some great stuff, but only really applies as a rule to more classical playing. I agree this is a good starting point, I'm glad you reminded me about that paper thing, I'll add it to the article.
 

Tommy Ng

Member
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583
Location
South Yorkshire
Should it be half an inch from the tip?

A question here, i move my lower jaw in and out to play high and low notes respectively... am i doing the wrong thing???
 

half diminished

Senior Member
Messages
1,361
Location
Buckinghamshire
Ok, here's what I tell my students (I think it's the Larry Teal method but can't quite remember where I read it all those years ago):

1. Take a piece of paper and slide it between reed and mouthpiece.

2. At the point where the paper meets firm resistance (the meeting point between reed and mouthpiece), make a pencil mark on the bottom of the reed.

3. Place your thumb on the reed with your nail facing back towards you and positioned perfectly on the line that you drew.

4. Put your bottom lip there.

While I realise that I tend to move about quite a lot on the piece for different tones/effects etc, I always find this to be a good starting point and a clear way to explain it to students. It makes sense logically aswell.

Glen
We'll I'm there or there abouts but then my tone, by all accounts is pretty reasonable. Now if only there were 'simple' instructions like that for improving speed, technique and improvisation.
 

GJ77

Senior Member
Messages
615
Location
Dunmow, Essex.
Sorry, but the best I can offer there is to worry less about the first than the second, and as far as the third goes...transcribe lots and try to relax when playing.

If only I practised what I preach!
 

FastFred

Member
Messages
80
I watched that heated debate on SOTW and at the time didn't make sense of Barone's 'take as much as you can' approach. I was always a 'small amount' man as I was constantly searching for a mellow tone with my YTS62.

I bought a Conn 10M a month ago, a 1940 real beauty. I now find that I am taking most of the mouthpiece in and it helps particularly with the bottom D which can warble. I can now get a variety of sounds and I feel I am making the tones via my diaphragm/throat as opposed to restricting or strangling it like I was before. I always thought my Link ebonite was stuffy at the top end till I got the Conn. Think I was just not allowing it enough air by too little mouthpiece.

That jaw in and out business looks common to me as I cruise some of the greats on youtube; suspect it's a necessity on the low notes if you don't take much mouthpiece?
 
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