SYOS

Saxophones My Frankentenor

jthole

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231
Ok, this is just a Buescher stencil, but I am intrigued by the combination of features on this sax. It's from 1963, btw, according to the serial number.

In playing, it's comparable to a good Selmer Bundy, I would say.
(which is not a bad thing, especially given what I paid for it)

I see features from at least 3 Buescher models ... do you spot more? :)









 

thomsax

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Nice sax. I think Eddie Shaw is playing on a Buescher Aristocrate. Still quite popular among Rocksaxophonists. Berg Larsen, metal or HR, mouthpieces and Bueschers are a powerful combination.

Thomas
 

thomsax

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To me it looks like the body and bell are from a Buescher Aristocrate from the 50's. The keys can be from later date. I don't know about the neck. Necks from 60's use to have braces.

For Selmer USA it was a good way to get rid of old inventory and left overs. Stencils are often good players when they are controlled and setup by a technician. A good way to get a fine sax for less money.

Thomas
 
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jthole

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231
the crook doesnt lok original and I would say its probably a leblanc/beaugnier crook as it looks identical, in its shape and also the key, to one I sold recently.
I think you are right.

This is a close-up:





Funny that a French neck works so well with an American sax :cool:
 
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jthole

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231
A very late update to my own thread ;}

1) The Bueagnier neck / Buescher body is a great match! I've tried a Bundy I neck, and the Beaugnier neck sounds fuller, and responds a bit better in the low notes. Intonation is spot on with both necks.

2) Since then, I also acquired a Martin Committee III "The Martin" tenor. And while the keywork and overall build quality of the Martin is much better, the (sort of) Buescher absolutely holds its own regarding the sound. If there would be any complaint, it might be just a bit thinner sounding in the palm keys (but then I am really looking for a justification for the Martin), but the Buescher low end, and middle registers, sound great, and are very flexible.

Bottom line; the resale value might be very low, but that Frankenhorn is a great player, despite the less than ideal keywork.
 
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jbtsax

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The title of this thread made me reminisce about my own "Frankentenor" story. Several years back, I found two old Conn tenors in local pawn shops that were in very poor condition with keys and parts missing. I was able to buy them at a reasonable price, so I took them to my basement "laboratory" and used the best parts of each to construct a working tenor sax. I even hand polished the keys and body and coated them with a clear lacquer spray I bought at a variety store. Needless to say, the lacquer did not hold up, and where it peeled off, the brass began to tarnish. As a result it became a "butt-ugly" sax, but it played quite well.

To make a long story short, Jason Dumars posted on SOTW that he wanted to buy an old Conn tenor to try. He and I worked out a deal where I traded my tenor to him in partial payment for some engraving on my Selmer SBA alto. Several weeks later in a thread on SOTW titled What's the 'best looking most beautiful' sax? Jason wrote: "I like my tenor" and posted this picture of Frankentenor.

 
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