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M/Pieces - Ligs Mouthpiece tip opening confusion...

DavidUK

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:confused:

Thought I'd found a good page of info, here: http://stohrermusic.com/2011/11/how-to-choose-a-saxophone-mouthpiece/

3/4 of the way down, under "The tip opening" the author says: "The larger the tip opening, the more it favors the higher partials, thus the brighter the sound. A stiffer reed on a more close tip opening will give you a darker sound than a softer reed on a larger tip opening on the same model mouthpiece."

On another site, about halfway down, here: http://mouthpieceworks.com/Terms.html

"Tip Opening: The distance from the tip rail to the tip of the reed, usually measured in thousandths of an inch. Usually, players will use softer reeds on larger tip openings. Smaller tips get a more focused, compact sound while larger tips get a bigger, fuller sound. A larger tip takes more air and is less resistant."

So, the first guy is saying larger opening = brighter sound, smaller opening = darker sound.
The second guy is saying larger opening = fuller sound, smaller opening = focused sound.

I'm reading "fuller" as darker, and "focused" as brighter. In other words the two authors are exactly opposite in what they say!

Now confused, I thought the 2nd one was correct?

Anyone? Tom? Help!!

:confused:
 

saxnik

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I don't think 'fuller' is necessarily 'darker' - certainly 'focused' doesn't strike me as 'brighter'! I think that there is some truth in both accounts here, but it's all subjective anyway.
I favour a larger tip opening with a softish reed, for a big (bright, full?) sound, plus I can work with the tuning better since there's more opportunity to adjust intonation and bend notes for effect.

Nick
 

Morgan Fry

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I'm reading "fuller" as darker, and "focused" as brighter. In other words the two authors are exactly opposite in what they say!

Don't do that, nobody else does.

All other things being equal, a larger tip opening will have a darker sound. But it will want a softer reed. A softer reed, all other things being equal, will have a brighter sound. All things never really being equal, you could end up brighter or darker sound with a larger tip and comfortable reed in the same model mouthpiece.
 

Paul Warner

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I go for comfort, and on the Bari' that is a tip opening corresponding to a Link or Yani' 7 or 8. On alto and tenor I play consistently with a 7 ebonite (certain situations on alto dictate a metal Yani 7, which cuts through pretty near anything), but on the sop I use a beautiful old 6** Lawton metal m/p which I bought as new from a guy who hated it (i.e. couldn't play on it! (mind you, he was a drummer!!)). I have never found a better sop m/p, but oddly enough have never much liked Lawtons on alto and tenor. I especially feel that a more open tip allows for a greater range of expression than a narrower tip. I generally use a medium reed on alto and tenor to suit the above, but used to prefer a harder reed on the sop'. Nowadays I like to go for a relaxed blow (hope that doesn't sound rude!).
 

Colin the Bear

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Chops first. Then decide what works best for you. Probably a drawer full.
 
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jbtsax

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I would disagree with Mr. Stohrer that a wider tip opening automatically results in a brighter sound with more high partials. It is true that many jazz mouthpieces with wider tip openings have a bright and edgy sound, but they also tend to have higher baffles as well. I'm no expert on mouthpieces, but I believe it is important to take into account the baffle and facing length as well when discussing the mouthpiece's tonal tendencies.
 

Paul Warner

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Very true......also, generally (there are always exceptions) a wider tip makes the lower, bell. register much easier to control. This is something taught me by dear old Leslie Evans, a player and a gentleman whom some of you may remember, and who played, taught and traded up to the late eighties. If you can find a copy of his essay on mouthpieces I'm sure you'll find it helpful. If I can find it after my cruise, I'll scan it and post it on this forum.
 

jbtsax

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That would be fantastic. Hope you can find it.
 

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