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Most Influential UK Jazz Musician

Josh Johnson

Member
Messages
125
Location
Rochester, Kent
As we know, Jazz is one of America's greatest cultural movements and we on the other side of the pond have been mesmorized ever since.

My question is this:

What one British person has had the biggest impact/influence on the whole of the jazz world....George Shearing? Dave Holland? Tubby Hayes? John Mclaughlin?

Who would you put forward, and why?
 

dooce

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,415
Location
Daventry
Mike Westbrook? Hard to define to what extent he may have influenced anything outside of these shores though when we are in probably the the worst position to judge. Much easier to see inward influences upon us than it is to see it working in reverse.
 

Lupifaro

Member
Messages
200
Location
Wales
For services to Jazz in general for me Ronnie Scott a great Tenor player,comedian and story teller:welldone
birdman
 

ManEast

Member
Messages
214
Location
Southsea .Portsmouth
As we know, Jazz is one of America's greatest cultural movements and we on the other side of the pond have been mesmorized ever since.

My question is this:

What one British person has had the biggest impact/influence on the whole of the jazz world....George Shearing? Dave Holland? Tubby Hayes? John Mclaughlin?

Who would you put forward, and why?
It has to be Mr Scott...but even he regarded Tubby Hayes to be our finest export.
 

Saxlicker

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,849
Location
Breakfast room since '06 UK
I never had a British influence in Jazz.
I never had Jazz influence before being totally hooked on sax.
However since there was no way of escaping the association of Jazz & sax, (fish and chips, bacon and eggs, honey and lemon, toddlers and snot, curry and beer, sunshine and shade) I grew into it.

So my picking is almost obviously.....Ronnie Scott,
I salute you Ronnie and hope you are jamming well with Bird & co.
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Would we know anything about jazz without the influences of some of the pre war bands and soloists?

Post war, there were guys like George Webb and his Dixieland band, who gave Humph an intro, Ken Colyer who went to New Orleans, Chris Barber, Lonnie Donnegan, Mick Mulligan, George Melly and Johnny Dankworth, who had some very inventive voicings.

Without these guys we would have never have experienced live jazz as the Musicians Union seemed to run a one for one personnel exchange and the Brits didn't count for much in the States.

So how can one nominate a singleton? If pressed, taking into consideration his personal jazz development, his wide appreciation for jazz in all its forms as displayed in his radio shows, it has to be Humphrey Littleton. If you insist that it must be a saxophonist, then E.O. (Poggy) Pogson.
 

Howard Long

Member
Messages
51
Location
London
I would also add Johnny Dankworth.

The Duke liked him so he must have been good.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dankworth
Sadly I read that Johnny Dankworth has passed away here. I was privileged to see him for my first and now only time at the Royal Festival Hall a couple of months ago at the London Jazz Festival with his wife Cleo Laine as well as his son and daughter, where he played two pieces, one on clarinet, the other on alto sax. Although he was wheelchair bound at the time, you certainly wouldn't have known from the sound.

Howard
 
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