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Mistakes I have made.......

visionari1

Senior Member
Messages
1,581
Recently I came across the repairs invoice (total repad and repair cost $136 and the sax cost $125!) when I purchased my first Sax (only ever had 2)

It was dated 1987, crighey that's 24 years and this got me thinking what would I do differently and, how far have I come in that time....God I've made some classic mistakes.

Maybe if I share them, others might learn faster. Back in 1987 there was no internet or Cafe Saxophone, even the Breakfast room was still just for eating!

I had been playing Clarinet for a few years before getting my Naked lady Conn Alto and did have some sax lessons but dropped them after a few months.

First big mistake and Ive made plently, so better just list things I'd do differently now as a newbie.

Get a teacher that I can relate to.

Start practicing reguarly to a practise shedule. (use a practise journal to keep you focused on where you've been and where you want to go)

Get to like playing scales and really understand the theory behind them.

Learn to read music but only to enhanse your ears.

I read music for years and didn't know what note I was playing on the sax, my mind went from the page to the sax without an awareness of what note I was playing, you might think this is good, but no, if some body said play an Eb I was lost.

I practised far to fast trying to cram things instead of learning slowly and getting a tune or scale totally learned.

I joined a local big band and played with them for a few years then stopped because I wanted to improvise (still do). Now I realize that was another big mistake.

Now I realize for me progress would have been much faster if I'd grasped basic theory, had a regular teacher, developed my ears to know what interval or scale or certain chords should sound like, and stuck to a consistent regular practise shedule.

Sometimes practising easy stuff (to keep things enjoyable) and the hard challenging stuff (to keep progressing).

I always wanted to be able to improvise and have been saying for years....it's coming...it's coming, and this for me has been a 20 + year journey.

I knew it would be tough and some people get there allot faster, but hey I have enjoyed myself immensly, and that enjoyment only gets better the longer I go.

I hope this gives others some insight into perhaps where they can learn from the mistakes I have made.

Who was it that said "Mistakes there are none" Miles Davis?

Cheers & Ciao
Jimu:mrcool
 
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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
I can relate to quite a few of those - and I've only been at it for a couple of years.... Need to print this out and frame it!
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,272
Some very good tips Jimu, i like the journal idea and the like scales approach it is something on the lines my teacher said to me "Like scales you'll love impro" getting back to the journal who knows in 10yrs time i could be advising a "newbie" with extracts from my journal, it's off to the shop i go.
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Indeed. Learn things slowly, very slowly. My teacher keeps telling me I go too fast even when I think I think I'm funereal ...and she's right.
YC
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
Subscriber
Messages
8,892
The only thing I regret is not buying a sax 10 or even 40 years earlier than I did.
 

Flipper2008

Member
Messages
116
wise words Jimu, Im determined to play better, I played on saturday night, and watching a video of it after really brought home how cack my playing is. So Im going right back to the beginning and gonna take my time !

Peace

Phil
 

Andante cantabile

Senior Member
Messages
695
This is real life stuff. Well worth reflecting on. One bit I find particularly interesting is your observation on the need of an awareness of the note one is playing. It is easy to think of B as "top-left finger", but much harder to think of B (or any other note) as a sound within a tonal environment. I sometimes wonder whether violinists or guitarists who have to make their own note have an advantage in this regard.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
One bit I find particularly interesting is your observation on the need of an awareness of the note one is playing. It is easy to think of B as "top-left finger", but much harder to think of B (or any other note) as a sound within a tonal environment. I sometimes wonder whether violinists or guitarists who have to make their own note have an advantage in this regard.
Not if my daughter's anything to go by. She's just changed cellos, the scale's slightly different and isn't hearing what she's playing.

I agree - once they've learnt to listen to what they're playing, things get a lot better. Same goes for all instruments - the player has to learn to translate the dots into a sound in the head, and then monitor what's coming out of the instrument. People who play by ear have a huge advantage here, and it's difficult at first to get away from reading the dots and listen to what you're doing.
 
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