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M/Pieces - Ligs Metal mouthieces ... why?

Philly123

Member
Messages
185
I've just bought myself a metal mouthpiece. I did this because my new teacher suggested that I did. He also suggested that I get a Berg Larsen or Otto Link (I can't remember which) but they both cost loads. I bought one (which wasn't either of these) but it looks very shiny and lovely. It's marked as an A7 which sounds bigger than my Yamaha 5c which I'm currently playing. I was worried that I wouldn't be able to get any sound out of it but I got most notes out of it, although there were lots of gaps.
The question I want to ask is, how does a metal mouthpiece contribute to one's playing.
 

C_Claudemonster

Formerly saxgirl22
Messages
399
Hi Philly123, I have a Lawton metal 6*B for tenor. I used it for 3 years succesfully then my teeth had some dental work done & I had to change m/piece to a closer lay as I just couldn't cope with it anymore. However, I don't think I will go back to an ebonite m/p from metal now as the sound it gives is more 'edgy' and it generally gives a fuller & warmer sound imo. Bear in mind that mouthpiece set ups are very personal so what works for one won't for another but I'm very happy with the metal, even more so as it was given to me! I find with ebonite that I can't get the projection I would like from my saxophone and as it's an old German Weltklang it's very suited to the sort of music I play such as the Madness numbers etc. I can be a bit more harsh with my sound and not feel bad about it :)
 

daveysaxboy

Big ruff Geordie bendy metal blower
Messages
3,312
I've just bought myself a metal mouthpiece. I did this because my new teacher suggested that I did. He also suggested that I get a Berg Larsen or Otto Link (I can't remember which) but they both cost loads. I bought one (which wasn't either of these) but it looks very shiny and lovely. It's marked as an A7 which sounds bigger than my Yamaha 5c which I'm currently playing. I was worried that I wouldn't be able to get any sound out of it but I got most notes out of it, although there were lots of gaps.
The question I want to ask is, how does a metal mouthpiece contribute to one's playing.
Your asking a question you cant answer.Some like,prefer metal,some hard rubber.You dont want to get caught up in why or if but what mp you like.I only like metal on tenor,why,they seem to suit me so thats my pick.I like hard rubber on alto.Dont get pushed into getting a mp you dont like.As for difference in sound thats for you to say and if you think there is thats the main thing.So many people will try and tell you there is or not.You pick the piece that suits your needs,likes and your comfort.
 

sushidushi

Mine's an espresso
Messages
651
Mine is neither metal nor rubber, just plastic - a Hite Premier. But I'm happy enough with it.

It strikes me (though I know next to nothing of these matters) to buy a mouthpiece just because of what it's made of. Surely there are some excellent metal pieces and some poor ones, and the same goes for rubber and plastic. I hope you're happy with yours. That's what matters ultimately.
 

tengu01

Member
Messages
725
Yup. It's a vexed question, right up there with what difference the finish/lacquer/metal of your sax has on your sound.

I think that if you like a mouthpiece and you can get up and down the instrument comfortably, then use that one. Metal or HR. Like Daveysaxboy, I prefer metal on tenor and HR on alto, but that might be because of how they feel to play, rather than specifically because of the material they're made from. On tenor, I use a Lawton 8*B, on alto, I use a Meyer 6.

...but wait. Your question was "what contribution does a metal mouthpiece make to what you're playing?" Answer: I don't think it does. It's just a question of what feels better for you and what you enjoy playing more. Metal mouthpieces can be made with a low baffle and rounded chamber for deep, smoochy warm sound. HR mouthpieces can be made with high baffles and tight chambers for blowing out the windows at the back of the hall. And vice-versa.

Good luck!
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,079
For me it matters not what the mouthpiece is made of. Sound and ease of play is paramount.

I suppose a metal mouthpiece is tougher than rubber or plastic and will withstand the rigours of transport, mis handling, accidents etc. Although they're not invulnerable.

Different materials offer different possibilities in the manufacturing processes and so alternative internal shaping becomes possible or cheaper.

I have a range of mouthpieces in various materials.

My favourites are modern plastic sop, vintage metal alto, vintage ebonite tenor, modern ebonite Bari.

It's all very personal and the only criteria for a mouthpiece is how it sounds.

A new mouthpiece should wow you from the first blow. Some play easily and some are more temperamental but are worth persevering with for that special sound. The right one will have a tone that melts your heart and almost play itself with perfect intonation throughout the range. Although I've settled on my mouthpieces, I think we're all still looking for that one.

The letter usually is the chamber size and the number the tip opening, so you've gone from a medium chamber, medium tip opening to a small chamber, largish tip opening. A slightly softer reed is indicated for that move and may make the lost notes reappear
 
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