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Recording making garden shed into a sound proof studio

carlosvan

New Member
Messages
18
i was just wondering if it would be possible to use my garden shed into a soundproof studio, i was looking at a drumming forum where members were discussing (fighting) on making the garden shed pretty much sound proof, that got me thinking if they nearly got it soundproof would a sax be quieter plus if you used a mute, you could then play till your hearts content, you would make inside walls with insulation plus foam tiles maybe, cover up window, throw out the lawn mower and bikes and dog food, im just thinking thats all , has anyone done anything like this?
 

Taz

Busking Oracle
Messages
3,662
I haven't, but I remember a friend of mine did many years ago. I seem to remember it was lined with polystyrene, cardboard and carpet tiles. He used to play electric guitar in there with drum machines etc. When you stood outside you could only just hear it so I guess it's very possible
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Was thinking about doing something like this in my basement, but decided not to. What I could find suggested a similar approach Taz's. Make sure you seal all gaps, including around the door. But... Make sure there's adequate ventilation. Some sources also suggested a reflector to play towards, otherwise the sound gets absorbed in the walls and you don't hear the sax properly.
 

Pete C

Member
Messages
344
I built a sound proof studio in my garden from scratch: essentially it is two sheds, one inside the other, each built from stud work, and lined with several layers of plasterboard. The inner shed floats on rubber blocks (extracted from one of those rubber link door mats 4). There are 4 rubber blocks at each end of the joists supporting the inner shed. There is one course of breeze block around the base. The outside is clad in shiplap timber boards. The entrance comprises two upvc double glazed doors, the inner one opening inwards, the outer one opening outwards. There is no ventilation but most of the time this is not a problem. If I rehearse 3, 4 or even 5 people in there, then we need to open the doors for an air change every half an hour or so. Floor area is about 4m x 3m. It is very sound proof and I wouldn't hesitate to play sax (unmuted) or drums at 2am in the morning if I was so inclined. So yes it is possible but quite expensive to do effectively, but absolutely one of the best things I ever did. Pete
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Thinking/remembering more, sound insulation is a common problem with modern building techniques, which led to materials being widely available for it.

You can get sound insulation grade rock wool to put between layers of plasterboard, and I believe there's a heavier grade of plasterboard for sound insulation purposes. You can also find sound insulating rubber products on the web.
 

AndyG

Member
Messages
324
This was something I looked into a while back and may still do when I get chance.
Fortunately, my shed is brick built with no windows, which will make it easier.
A good site for information and products to use is http://www.soundservice.co.uk/
Includes info on soundproof ventilation.
To achieve the best results, as Pete C mentions, is to basically build a shed inside a shed.
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Supporter
Messages
14,025
I have an article on soundproofing here:

http://mediamusicforum.com/home-soundproofing.html

(and by coincidence the advertisers sponsoring that page are sound service, so if you are going to use them at all, click on that link which will notify them someone cam from my page which is a good thing)

The cheapest/effective thing is layers of plasterboard. i.e. solid heavy bulk as opposed to foam.

If the structure will stand it, you could pin plasterboard onto the batons, and fill the cavity with and. That will be very effective. Any windows should be double glazed.


One of the biggest problems is ventilation. (Staying Alive, staying alive…)
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
Some of you may remember my recent post requesting advice on supporting the floor joists in the new office/studio that i am building, well it's almost complete, i attached batons to the walls and filled everything with rock wool (about £3.00 a roll from B&Q) i didn't do anything with the roof as it was an existing feature and i didn't want to mess it up, there are no windows but one door that opens up into the kitchen so overall i am hoping it should be OK, on one side theres a young couple with a two year old, on the other side another young couple expecting in April so i want to be about right, not that anyones said anything yet but you never know.

One thing though, and Pete maybe you could answer this, whats the best material for the floor, carpet or laminate? or doesn't it really make much difference? what do you have on yours?
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Supporter
Messages
14,025
Some of you may remember my recent post requesting advice on supporting the floor joists in the new office/studio that i am building, well it's almost complete, i attached batons to the walls and filled everything with rock wool (about £3.00 a roll from B&Q) i didn't do anything with the roof as it was an existing feature and i didn't want to mess it up, there are no windows but one door that opens up into the kitchen so overall i am hoping it should be OK, on one side theres a young couple with a two year old, on the other side another young couple expecting in April so i want to be about right, not that anyones said anything yet but you never know.

One thing though, and Pete maybe you could answer this, whats the best material for the floor, carpet or laminate? or doesn't it really make much difference? what do you have on yours?
My studio floor has wood in the control room and carpet in the live room, which i can roll back for a more live sound.

If there are computers/audio equipment, then you might want to make sure you have anti static floor covering (most office carpeting is I think for that reason)

Neither carpet or laminate will make a big lot of difference for sound proofing if that is a consideration, except that heavy carpet and underfelt might be marginally better.
 

jeremyjuicewah

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,890
Would you believe it? Here is me trying to make my soundproof studio into a garden shed. Dont throw away that lawnmower, I will have it.
 

Pete C

Member
Messages
344
The floor in my studio is chipboard covered with one layer of carpet tiles then a carpet and the under-foor space is completely enclosed by the breeze block footings, so is isolated from the outside sound-wise.
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
Subscriber
Messages
8,905
i am hoping it should be OK, on one side theres a young couple with a two year old, on the other side another young couple expecting in April so i want to be about right,
From your description of what you've done it should be alright.
When you are playing in there you won't be disturbed by the screaming brats.
 

Hajera

New Member
Messages
1
You could use egg cartons to insulate the walls...

Does anyone know the absorption rate of vibratory frequencies when using such mediums?
The amount of reflection of the vibrations?

What about with just using the shed as it is...what's the rate of echo?
 
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