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Louder vocal mic

zootsaxenberger

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510
Location
kent
I know that this is a bit random but,one of the bands i play in, (i play in several, have to earn a crust) i share lead vocals with a girl singer, and also i sing backing vocals.
However i am finding it a bit hard to compete volume wise because she is using a Shure Beta
mic whilst i am still using an old beat up unidyne.
does anyone have any suggestions? i am trying to save for an effects unit so i am thinking lower end.
my local music shop suggested JTS tm929 anyone tried these?
 
Hi Zootsaxenberger,

First, I have no experaince with the JTS tm929 but at £20 it's unlikely to 'compete' with the Shure Beta (which ever model it might be).

When you say you are struggling with volume, are you maxed out on the gain control on the input of the mixer/PA and the fader all the way up? Unless the unidyne is pushing out a very piddly signal it sounds more like the balance between you and the singer is wrong.

Each channel should have a gain control on it and this should be adjusted so that when the fader is set to 0, the signal should read 0 on the meters (Analogue only, for digital it should be at around -12dB or maybe lower).

You do this for each channel, which means that your signal and her signal are the same strength. Then using the only the faders you adjust the overall mix so that the instruments and vocals are in balance with each other.

Best wishes,

Chris
 
Hi Zootsaxenberger,

First, I have no experaince with the JTS tm929 but at £20 it's unlikely to 'compete' with the Shure Beta (which ever model it might be).

When you say you are struggling with volume, are you maxed out on the gain control on the input of the mixer/PA and the fader all the way up? Unless the unidyne is pushing out a very piddly signal it sounds more like the balance between you and the singer is wrong.

Each channel should have a gain control on it and this should be adjusted so that when the fader is set to 0, the signal should read 0 on the meters (Analogue only, for digital it should be at around -12dB or maybe lower).

You do this for each channel, which means that your signal and her signal are the same strength. Then using the only the faders you adjust the overall mix so that the instruments and vocals are in balance with each other.

Best wishes,

Chris
Hello chris.

Firstly my local music shop are selling this mic foe close to £50, so maybe i did the right thing putting this on the forum.
as to the rest the band uses a mackie pa and although the sound guy seems to get the balance about right,when we get into the more raucous numbers i have to push my voice to compete with hers and therefore by the end of the evening i get very hoarse.
 
I'd suggest a Shure SM58, they're good and as tough as old boots. You can get a new one for about ninety quid and a used one for £50 to £70. It'll be all the mike you need for stage work, and will last as long as you will.
 
We have JTS PDM 3 and JTS PDM 57 as extra microphones (my own microphone is a Shure SM 57). They are good. You have a really trained ear if you can hear the differnce between JTS and Shure. But I think Shure is better built/quality. Feels better. So after all a new Shure or used is cheaper in the long run. The JTS TM-929 is cheaper than JTS PDM 3. Both are vocal microphones but also good for sax.

Thomas
 

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