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Loose baritone neck.

Alc.

Senior Member
Messages
737
Locality
High plains of N/W New Mexico.
On my Buescher bari the neck is loose where it fits into the loop. I don't want to put a lot of pressure on the screw, like applying a wrench. Is there anything I could coat the metal with to add a layer, to build it up enough so the finger-screw would be enough to tighten? I don't much like the thought of applying a layer of solder. That idea sounds like overkill. But the result would have to be more or less permanent, so I wouldn't have to apply it every time I applied the neck. Any thoughts?
 

jbtsax

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8,733
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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
I would suggest you take it to a repair tech. There are special tools that are used to expand the neck tenon to make it fit snug again. You are correct in not wanting to over tighten the screw because that can distort the shape of the receiver and create a pocket that will cause a leak. Adding a layer of solder to the tenon is not a viable solution because the solder is such a soft material that it will quickly wear off. In my area a straightforward tenon fitting usually costs around $15 - $25 and can sometimes be done while you wait.
 

MandyH

Sax-Mad fiend!
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3,582
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The Malverns, Worcs
I was going to make the same suggestion. I had similar done for my previous Bari - the neck could always move in the socket. The sax tech worked the tenon end of the neck and made it a bit bigger. Didn't cost silly money, but can't remember exactly - £10-15, maybe.
 

Alc.

Senior Member
Messages
737
Locality
High plains of N/W New Mexico.
Thanks, JBT and Mandy. I am roughly 100 miles from Albuquerque so the trip is not overwhelming. Now to head for the Yellow Pages. Even in this high-plains wasteland there is bound to be a tech somewhere. Thanks again.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
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21,912
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Just north of Munich
Agree with the others. If the neck is loose, it's probably leaking, so a fix will improve the tone as well as playability.
 

Alc.

Senior Member
Messages
737
Locality
High plains of N/W New Mexico.
That's good to know, Kev. I need all the help I can get. Thanks.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,778
Locality
Burnley bb9 9dn
Remember the saxophone is made of brass. It's a low tensile alloy that is quite malleable. Using a wrench on any screws would probably strip the thread before it had any affect on the neck joint. I have the same problem on my alto if I use too much grease. Very little can be to much causing the neck to change position when playing.
 

jbtsax

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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
From a tech's point of view, metal to metal fittings like tuning slides on brass that stay in one position for long periods of time should be lubricated. Metal to metal fittings on woodwinds like flute head joints, saxophone necks, and bass clarinet necks that are removed frequently should only be kept very clean. The reason is that grease can hold small contaminants that can score and scratch the metal. I like to clean mine using a soft cloth and rubbing alcohol.

Many sax players don't understand that a well fit neck should be completely airtight before tightening the screw. The screw's only purpose is to snug the top of the receiver so that the neck doesn't turn while playing. My standard for fitting a neck is that it takes only 1/4 turn of the screw to hold the neck firmly in place.
 

Alc.

Senior Member
Messages
737
Locality
High plains of N/W New Mexico.
Ah, The Turn of the Screw. Could be Henry James had neck problems, too. Or not. I understand and appreciate all of the above. I want to see how the tech goes about expanding the tenon. It must be a delicate procedure. I would not like to see him put a crack in the metal.
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
It is really quite simple. I use the "can opener" style expander From Ferree's Tools shown below. The metal of the tenon is compressed between two rotating steel wheels and as a result of making the metal thinner, the ring expands. The trick is to not go too far and over expand the brass. They make a "neck shrinker" for that but it is quite expensive.

 

Alc.

Senior Member
Messages
737
Locality
High plains of N/W New Mexico.
Interesting apparatus. I'm making an appointment with a tech for next week.
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,432
Locality
Sweden
From a tech's point of view, metal to metal fittings like tuning slides on brass that stay in one position for long periods of time should be lubricated. Metal to metal fittings on woodwinds like flute head joints, saxophone necks, and bass clarinet necks that are removed frequently should only be kept very clean. The reason is that grease can hold small contaminants that can score and scratch the metal. I like to clean mine using a soft cloth and rubbing alcohol.

Many sax players don't understand that a well fit neck should be completely airtight before tightening the screw. The screw's only purpose is to snug the top of the receiver so that the neck doesn't turn while playing. My standard for fitting a neck is that it takes only 1/4 turn of the screw to hold the neck firmly in place.

I have also been told that grease is tabu on metal neck-sax joint. I had a late King Super 20 tenor that had a neck that was too small compared to the sax. I had to use a tape that plumbers use. Nothing to recommend in the long run, but it helped. And it didn't made the sax worse.
 

allansto

Senior Member
Messages
480
Locality
Frankston Victoria Australia
for a temporary fix you could buy some brass shim plate (fairly cheap) cut a slice with some old scissors
then wrap it around the neck and cut it to length.
Shim comes in various thicknesses.
usually is bought buy the packet and has varying thicknesses in the pack.
then slide it into the bore and it should just stay there once you retighten the neck screw.
cheers
allansto
 

Alc.

Senior Member
Messages
737
Locality
High plains of N/W New Mexico.
Thomsax, I tried the plumber's tape (teflon) and it worked perfectly! I hit low b flat with no problem. It's a temporary fix, but it works. I stretched a layer around the tenon, worked the neck into the loop, and it took a half-turn of the screw to make it snug. Many thanks.
 

YummyTaco

New Member
Messages
4
Locality
Aztec, NM
Alc, have you found anyone for sax repair?

I just moved back, and found Katzen is closed. Strings & Things, and Main Street Music in Aztec don't have techs, There's rumored to be a guy in Durango, and I know someone that used to do repairs, but can't get a hold of him.
 

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