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sax.co.uk

Lies we tell our children ...

Messages
135
Location
Lanjaron, Granada, Spain.
#1
Because I study anomalies I'm forever picking holes in the 'accepted wisdom' which surrounds me on all sides.
Because I'm naturally obstreperous and argumentative, I get a great deal of pleasure from finding inconsistencies in our history and science, as well as subjects not dealt with here.
Anyone who shares my resentment at being told porkies* by well-paid academics will probably find the video I saw last night on Youtube very interesting indeed.

"AMERICAN TEXTBOOK LIES - everything your teacher got wrong."

Not for a moment do I suspect this only happens in the USA, I'm sure every country is 'selective' in what it teaches the kids regarding their history, with England having more to draw a veil over than I could shake a stick at.
If one studies Egyptology, it soon becomes apparent that academics are clinging to the wreckage of their earlier pronouncements in the face of insuperable evidence to the contrary.
Megalithic structures all over the world show that 'primitive' early man constructed what would barely be possible now.
The oldest race of which we know, the Sumerians, should be the most primitive, yet their astronomers identified Pluto, they had writing, theatres and many kinds of sophistication.
The pyramids, with their fantastic engineering and astronomical precision were built by enslaved farmers ........
Yeah - right.

But worst of all, our children are being taught a sanitised version of history which keeps them in ignorance of their past, and denies understanding of the present.

*"Porkies" -- cockney rhyming slang, pork pies = lies.
 

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
Subscriber
Messages
3,296
Location
manchester
#6
Probably best just to fall in line with the rest of us sheeples and believe everything they(not sure who they are) tell us and don't make any waves, why would they lie to us baaaaa
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
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7,446
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KIC 8462852
#7
Someone far more eloquent than me once said 'the greatest thing about winning a war is that you get to write the history books'...
The most egregious example of that is by the barbaric, warmongering empire builders, the Romans, who after conquering and destroying civilisations tried to erase them from history.

(Cue clips from Life of Brian).
 

Tiberius

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,027
#8
... the Romans, who after conquering and destroying civilisations tried to erase them from history.
The Carthaginians certainly, but the Roman empire spanned an equivalent of roughly the time from the Norman invasion to today, like England over that time frame the Romans tried everything from annihilation to integration.

The Egyptians and Greeks similar; was Alexander a 'great' or a 'teenage hooligan'?
 

Tiberius

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,027
#10
...Technology changes but people don't, however far you go back.
Actually this is very true. One of Cicero's writings (2,000 years ago) translates something like "the trouble with the youth of today is that they have no respect for their elders'...now where have I heard that

Also, a further 2,000 years back, Ramses' description of his 'victory' at the battle of Kadesh (score draw at best) is a brilliant piece of propaganda worthy of any modern politician.
 

David Dorning

Senior Member
Messages
535
Location
Chichester, UK
#12
Someone far more eloquent than me once said 'the greatest thing about winning a war is that you get to write the history books'...England has won a lot of wars :)
Not just the history books. I read comics as a kid in the early 60s and learned how tough, intelligent and handsome all English soldiers/sailors/airmen were and how puny, stupid, ugly and goofy all their enemies had been in WWII.

Forum rules prevent me from discussing in detail what I was taught at school about the origin of the world but suffice to say it would not have been off topic.
 
Messages
135
Location
Lanjaron, Granada, Spain.
#13
Although my initial concern was in relation to the education of our children, I realised during the responses that my main responsibility to myself and others is to locate the lies I've taken on board, which now colour my thinking.

At school I was convinced I was hopeless at maths. That was a lie, but it was true as long as I let it be.
My older brother was the artist, I was the mechanic -- until I emerged from under that one and made my living as an artist - something he never did.

Opinions I formed years ago need to be regularly checked to see if they still are useful and accurate, and it is so easy to confuse my personal opinions with the idea 'that's just the way it is.'
I think a better mantra is "It ain't necessarily so ....."
 

richardr

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,725
#14
Someone far more eloquent than me once said 'the greatest thing about winning a war is that you get to write the history books'...England has won a lot of wars :)
Also, a further 2,000 years back, Ramses' description of his 'victory' at the battle of Kadesh (score draw at best) is a brilliant piece of propaganda worthy of any modern politician.
Perhaps the first quotation is true initially, but the second shows that nowadays history is analysed by so many people, some with a genuine aim to discover the truth, others wanting to support their own political views, that it's left to the average punter to pick the version he prefers, but woe betide those whose choice is non-PC.
An example of this was about ten years ago when my daughter wrote an essay for her history A-level giving a reasoned opinion on one aspect of WWI that was contrary to the PC view. Her school expected that she'd get a very high mark for her essay; in fact it was marked "unclassified" which meant that she got no mark at all. Even without any marks for that essay she still got a high "B".
On a lighter note, in answer to a pupil's question, my primary school teacher told us that the way a gas refrigerator worked was that the gas was made to burn cold. Imagine the mirth of my fellow pupils at secondary school when I cited this as an example of an endothermic reaction.
 
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Veggie Dave

Bisaxual
Subscriber
Messages
2,125
Location
Hutton, Essex
#16
If one studies Egyptology
Ooh, that would be me. Purely for pleasure, though.

it soon becomes apparent that academics are clinging to the wreckage of their earlier pronouncements in the face of insuperable evidence to the contrary.
Er...

Megalithic structures all over the world show that 'primitive' early man constructed what would barely be possible now.
Wrong. And incorrect use of the word primitive. Ancient and primitive are not the same thing.

The oldest race of which we know, the Sumerians, should be the most primitive, yet their astronomers identified Pluto, they had writing, theatres and many kinds of sophistication.
Except the Sumerians weren't primitives. Again, an argument based on an incorrect assumption.

The pyramids, with their fantastic engineering and astronomical precision were built by enslaved farmers ........
Yeah - right.
You're right, that's drivel ... as anyone remotely interested in Egyptology could tell you.

But worst of all, our children are being taught a sanitised version of history which keeps them in ignorance of their past, and denies understanding of the present.
And we end with a sweeping generalisation with no specifics that can be verified.

As arguments go, I think you need to put a little more work into your thesis. A good starting point I think would be to verify that what you think other people believe is what they actually believe.

history is analysed by so many people, some with a genuine aim to discover the truth, others wanting to support their own political views, that it's left to the average punter to pick the version he prefers, but woe betide those whose choice is non-PC.
Really? Care to provide an example that we can check and evaluate for ourselves?
 

richardr

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,725
#17
Really? Care to provide an example that we can check and evaluate for ourselves?
Really? Care to provide an example that we can check and evaluate for ourselves?
I’m not sure what you’re driving at so I’ll answer your question literally. One area into which I’ve read extensively is the First World War with particular emphasis on whether the British were truly “Lions Led by Donkeys” or otherwise. There’s plenty of easily-accessible literature on the subject of which I’ve read only a fraction. I’ve done no original research, only read the facts (sometimes conflicting accounts) and the opinions provided by others. From this I’ve formed my own opinions.
 

Veggie Dave

Bisaxual
Subscriber
Messages
2,125
Location
Hutton, Essex
#19
One area into which I’ve read extensively is the First World War with particular emphasis on whether the British were truly “Lions Led by Donkeys” or otherwise.I’ve done no original research, only read the facts (sometimes conflicting accounts) and the opinions provided by others. From this I’ve formed my own opinions.
But that's just the study of history.

Well, it is unless you came to the conclusion it was actually down to the jews/aliens etc., which I'm assuming you didn't. ;)

You said that historical facts are being suppressed for politically correct reasons, so I asked for specific examples that could be explored.
 
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