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Beginner Learning to read music !

TinyDragon

New Member
Messages
11
I thought i'd start a new thread about this rather than add it to my other thread as i bet there are other beginners who could benifit from the topic and this way it would be easy to find! (ramble over sry)

Ok so ... Im teaching my self to read music and i was hoping you guys would be able to give me some pointers.. are there any good self help books/dvd/websites that you would recommend.

Any useful tips you can share with a noob !

Thx All (^_^)
 

Sunray

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,708
Internet Links and a Book ...

----------- 8< --------- Polite Snip ----------- 8< ---------

Any useful tips you can share with a noob !

Thx All (^_^)

Hey Hey [from one n00b to another] lmao ;} ...

Here are some links which may be of use to you:

music theory & history online - Dr. Brian Blood
Dolmetsch Online - Music Theory Online Contents
-------
Introduction to Reading Music
Introduction to Reading Music
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Ricci Adams' Musictheory.net
musictheory.net
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Music Theory: The Learn Music Free Project
Music Theory: The Learn Music Free Project
-------

Cheers ... :cheers:

PS - I find this book quite good as I can pick it up "do a few chapters" and leave it for a few days .... ;}
 
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TinyDragon

New Member
Messages
11
yes Thank you so much for all the links, thats such a great help ..

Loving all the nice helpful people im discovering here (^_^)
:welldone
 

Justin Chune

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,011
Any of the many beginner books out there would get you started. Keep it simple. Andy Hampton's "Saxophone Basics" might suit you or "Learn As You Play" by Peter Wastell.

Jim.
 

stefank

Member
Messages
366
And once you've got a bit of theory under your belt, go and play in a community concert band (or similar) for a while. You'll regularly have music you've never seen before poked under your nose, and necessity is the mother of all sorts of things!
 

TinyDragon

New Member
Messages
11
I dont think i'll be joining any bands .. This is a guilty pleasure for me (^_^) I may change my mind at some point but right now im just enjoying it in the secret of my own home in my own time on my own terms :)
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
You may also be interested in the London College of Music "Popular Music Theory" series - which covers learning from Preliminary to Grade 8, and is nicely paced. Preliminary to Grade 2 should get you to a good level.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:

BTW if you "Go Advanced" you no longer have to contrive any "Smilies"......:shocked::w00t:;}
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
You could also try the ABRSM (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music) grade workbooks, starting at Grade 1. This gives you a basic introduction to pitch, note lengths, how it is written down etc. The companion Guide to Music Theory (also ABRSM) covers all this in an understandable way, up to Grade 5.

El Robo - keep at it! I did Grade 5 theory earlier this year, as I reported in a thread at the time - first exam I had taken for 30 years - and passed with distinction. It's really helpful in my playing and reading.
YC
 

El Robo

Member
Messages
56
YC
Like most people time is always of a premium and any time I have spare I would rather be playing. However you are right about it helping playing and reading. So I do feel a little less guilty about using that time!

I'm using the ABRSM Music Theory in Practice workbooks and associated theory book. They seem to be logically laid out and have helped me "fill in the gaps". As i've gained a little knowledge it has helped me alot with my sight reading tests, i think because I can understand what I'm reading rather than taking a guess at it.

el robo
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
Messages
2,773
Try How to Read Music by James Sleigh and Mike Sheppard. A really good book in my opinion. Has a website to aaid the learning process
I got mine from Jazzwise

Andy
 

JustaSax

New Member
Messages
1
I dont think i'll be joining any bands .. This is a guilty pleasure for me (^_^) I may change my mind at some point but right now im just enjoying it in the secret of my own home in my own time on my own terms :)
I totally understand how you feel about being in a band as I felt the same. However, being in a band is brilliant! You progress quicker, you learn things you didn't realise exsisted, you make new friends and playing live music infront of a crowd is a real buzz.

Too answer your question; Eric Taylor's, First steps in music theory (ABRSM) is handy as it is so small and I carry it around in my pocket when I'm on the road. I've read it on trains, planes and any where I sit for more than 5 minutes!
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
im just enjoying it in the secret of my own home
Ha ha, oh no your not!! everyone down the street can hear believe me! i too thought becawse i was in my own house alone, and no one could see me that was it but no you may as well be on a band stand mate, i've had quite a few comments all very nice i might add, apart from one lady who a bit sarcasticaly said "oh your sax playing is getting a bit better" in other words give it a rest for God's sake will you? no i quite often see folk, perticuarly the old dears nudging each other and looking in my direction and you can just immagine them saying "oh look it's the sax vertuoso from number7" or "there goes the musician" or at least i hope that's what they are saying!!

Back though to reading music, as some of the other members have said, plenty of on-line stuff to look at as well as basic early learning books, and although regarded as a chore by many i think i'ts vitaly important to learn how to read and develop yourself into a strong site reader, i mean lets supose you are a fine player who solely plays by ear and can improvise and someone askes you to dep for them in the local big band, you've got no chance mate!
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904

Back though to reading music, as some of the other members have said, plenty of on-line stuff to look at as well as basic early learning books, and although regarded as a chore by many i think i'ts vitaly important to learn how to read and develop yourself into a strong site reader, i mean lets supose you are a fine player who solely plays by ear and can improvise and someone askes you to dep for them in the local big band, you've got no chance mate!


Got to agree with this. I was lucky enough to learn to read music as a kid. A lot of adult learners seem to be very nervous about it. But it's probably the easiest thing about learning to play music, and it opens so many doors. Eg, transcriptions of great solos. Yes, you can (given enough time and patience) work them out for yourself, but if you can't write them down and read them back...

The other thing is that unlike, say, scales and embouchure, once you've learned to read, it's there forever (barring Alzheimer's and the like) without having to practice.
 

saxyman

Member
Messages
267
If you get bored doing too much reading and have a computer, you may find the interactive programme "Smart Music" to be helpful.
It does not just teach how to read music but how to implement that knowledge as you proceed.
Not the "be all and end all" but useful and a engaging alternative.
Believe you can dload a trial of it and its very cheap to obtain, no purchase but a yearly subscription of around £20-£30
 

AndyPacino

New Member
Messages
1
Top site. I'm just starting out and I have Pete's DVD, which is brilliant, but I was (until the links) lacking any real sense of timing. Cheers an absolute bundle for the advice. Honk honk!
 
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