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KRK Rokit 5 Studio Monitors,WOW

daveysaxboy

Big ruff Geordie bendy metal blower
Messages
3,312
Not a sound clip but i have to say anyone with the cash and recording should check these KRK Rokit 5 nearfield studio monitors.There amazing in sound and build.Did i mention the sound ,double WOW
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,369
Can someone explain to me how studio monitors differ from hi-fi speakers and what 'nearfield' monitors do ?

I've got some excellent KEF and B&W speakers sitting in the loft as well as some decent Q Acoustic bookshelf speakers on my Denon mini system. Maybe I should have them connected to my computer.

Rhys
 

Chris

Well Known
Subscriber
Messages
3,821
Rhys, Hi-Fi speakers are designed to make all music sound good.(simple answer anyway) Studio monitors are design to give a flat sound response so the e sound enginer can hear what is going on properly, this..
.
The "near field" of a loudspeaker is area where the direct,
unreflected sound from the speaker dominates significantly over the
indirect and reflected sound, sound bouncing off walls, floors,
ceilings, the console. Monitoring in the near field can be useful
because the influence of the room on the sound is minimized.

Near field monitors have to be physically rather small, because you
essentially need a small relative sound source to listen to (imagine
sitting two feet away from an 18" woofer and a large multi- cellular
horn!). The physics of loudspeakers puts severe constraints on the
efficiency, power capabilities and low frequency response of small
boxes, so these small, near-field monitors can be inefficient and not
have the lowest octave of bass and not play ungodly loud.

is a near field monitor..

Chris...
 

daveysaxboy

Big ruff Geordie bendy metal blower
Messages
3,312
Can someone explain to me how studio monitors differ from hi-fi speakers and what 'nearfield' monitors do ?

I've got some excellent KEF and B&W speakers sitting in the loft as well as some decent Q Acoustic bookshelf speakers on my Denon mini system. Maybe I should have them connected to my computer.

Rhys

Well hi fi speakers are made to push certain sounds like more bass,or top or stuff like that.A true studio monitor is made to push nothing.You get a flat as can be natural sound on playing back your recording which is what you need when doing the final mix down.If you use a hi fi speaker it could be bass heavy so when you mix it to that and later play your song on a other player,cd deck etc the sound mix will be very different.You get what you pay for and i have some great big Technic and JVC speakers but never used them.I used till now my very good wedge monitor by Alto which has lots of presets on it so i had it flat.The powered monitors were my last thing i wanted so waited till i could get good 1's.The KRK Rokits are 1 of the best so i'm glad i waited.Nearfield just means you have them set up very close to you in a triangle shape with yourself.Having the tweeters at ear level.I have spent alot over the last few months but my little studio is now done and i'm glad i done it.
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
I have a pair of Yamaha HS 80 M near fields, absolutely astounding sound quality, am also running a M-Audio 10-10 sound card otherwise you just don't get the sound quality through the built in sound module within the PC, the speakers each have built in 150 watt powered amps, not cheap but very good...
 

Saxlicker

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,932
I asked a lot of these questions some while back.

Took in a lot of advice then chose something relatively unpopular.
I went with the yamaha HS-50m's.
Until I got them my mixing was done on a bose docking station....yep you heard right!
Unsurprisingly I'd spend alot of time running from the car stereo to the ipod, to the home stereo speakers, to someone elses lap top e.t.c. to try to find a sweet spot for my recordings that would transfer across any listening device.
That (and to your own taste) is what you are after from Near field Monitors.

In truth, I don't think any monitor is capable of completely flattening everything out (and even if they did not everyone will agree) not least because the room you are in will still have influence but some monitors will have a tonal balance that appeals to you and you'll learn to work with them gaining consistency and ultimately saving time in your quest during mixing.

I felt I could work with the Yams during a demo in the shop because I took my recordings that I'd found hard to get consistent across a range of listening devices & some of my poorest efforts. It was the yams that revealed the nasty bits.
I too liked the rockits but they were a little too eager to please in comparison with the yams.
 
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