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Keeping Mainstream Jazz Alive

Danny Luciano

New Member
Messages
11
I would like to take this opportunity to introduce myself and our new website www.dannyluciano.com . In order to gain worldwide exposure, we are asking for your consideration of promoting and spreading the word about our efforts. Our intention is to create a platform for mainstream jazz educating the younger players about the Ladies & Gentlemen of Jazz from the past, some of which have remained in obscurity. For example: Gene Ammons, Illinois Jacquet, Red Prysock plus many others.

I began my musical career in the mid-fifties playing tenor saxophone with local bands in the area of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. During this time, I studied the saxophone rudiments with Mike Guerra, the former Granoff Music School teacher, of John Coltrane, Gerry Mulligan, and many others around the Philadelphia area. Mike Guerra also had his private studio in the Presser Building located 18th & Chestnut Streets in center city Philadelphia. Having more than 55 years of experience as a tenor saxophonist has given me the opportunity to express my viewpoints on the meaning of Mainstream Jazz -Straight Ahead Jazz and the meaning of “Playing in the Pocket” in other words . . . “It Don’t Mean A Thing . . . If It Ain’t Got That Swing!”



Sincerely yours,

Danny Luciano


www.DannyLuciano.com
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Big welcome from me, hope your new site goes well. There's a good thread going at the moment about jazz being dead - I guess you have other ideas!!!
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,545
Welcome to the caff©, Danny.

Mainstream? That's a term from the sixties.

ENJOY!
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Supporter
Messages
13,958
Welcome to the caff©, Danny.

Mainstream? That's a term from the sixties.

ENJOY!
But actually a very good term IMO, but maybe has changed meaning. I think it used to mean jazz more modern than dixieland but not quite as modern as bebop, which some people referred to as "modern". To be even more confusing, I notice people referring to "trad" meaning jazz from the 50s (bebop, cool, hardbop and "mainstream') as opposed to it's original meaning of dixieland/chicago.

And let's not even start on the current or original meaning of R&B.
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,272
Welcome to the cafe from the pool of life :)

Recently got into jazz when i took up learning alto sax, wish i had got into both years ago
 

Danny Luciano

New Member
Messages
11
But actually a very good term IMO, but maybe has changed meaning. I think it used to mean jazz more modern than dixieland but not quite as modern as bebop, which some people referred to as "modern". To be even more confusing, I notice people referring to "trad" meaning jazz from the 50s (bebop, cool, hardbop and "mainstream') as opposed to it's original meaning of dixieland/chicago.

And let's not even start on the current or original meaning of R&B.
Hey Guys,
Unfortunately, the terms and interpretations can be confusing as (Tomato) or (Tom - AAA - to)
My playing experience has always been – to relate to the listening audience so that they have an enjoyable time at a performance . . .that’s what they paid for.
Let us not forget those who paved the way - - - Gene Ammons, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Sam ‘The Man’ Taylor, Willis Jackson, Earl Bostic and others who were crowd pleasers in the past.
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Welcome Danny.
Right with you in terms of it don't mean a thing if it got that swing! Out of the many styles of jazz that I love, mainstream/straight ahead is a big one. Despite what some commentators say, it's still going strong and got a following. In the UK we have some great players, among sax players alone people like Karen Sharp, Robert Fowler, Alan Barnes. And there are still plenty of good Americans. I recently saw Scott Hamilton who still swings as though his life depends on it but in a deceptive, laid back, Lester Young sort of way.

In another thread I recently quoted the British jazz writer Alyn Shipton who uses the phrase "loooking forward from within the tradition". That's what these people do and it's what all great jazz players do - understanding jazz from it's very earliest beginnings and carrying it forward.

Good luck!

YC
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi Danny!

A Big Welcome to the Cafe from the South Wales North European Jazz Foundation. The discussion KevG was referring to was whether Jazz was no longer cool, which seemed to draw a possible conclusion that US Jazz might no longer be cool, but that Jazz is not exclusively American. I imagine, therefore, that you are talking primarily about Mainstream American Jazz, not any other type of Jazz.

Kind regards
Tom
 

Sweet Dreamer

Senior Member
Messages
505
Danny Luciano
supporting youngsters on piano
and saxophones that swing the beat
from the bari to soprano


Introducing youth
to a sound that's so uncouth
that all the people playing it
are drowning in vermouth


Dance away the hours
swing your partner to the beat
In the morning send her flowers
so she'll know that you are sweet


Then practice on the saxophone
till triplets flow like honey
It's the only way to guarantee
you'll play your way to money


Jazz is far from dead you see
It's mainstream recreation!
All the youngsters really need
is some jazzy inspiration



:mrcool

Welcome to Café Saxophone

~~~

And best of luck with your website and goals. ;}

 

Danny Luciano

New Member
Messages
11
A sincere Thank you for the poem - through our endeavors here we have always tried to give awareness to the some young players male or female to appreciate and listen to masters of the past. Unfortunately, some seem disconcerted and change the subject.
 

Danny Luciano

New Member
Messages
11
Tom,

It has been my experience lately here in America with some younger musicians that they neglect to remember the Jazz legends of the past in having more concern with the more un-meaningful technique approach rather than the melodic continuity of a solo.
 

Danny Luciano

New Member
Messages
11
Hi Danny!

A Big Welcome to the Cafe from the South Wales North European Jazz Foundation. The discussion KevG was referring to was whether Jazz was no longer cool, which seemed to draw a possible conclusion that US Jazz might no longer be cool, but that Jazz is not exclusively American. I imagine, therefore, that you are talking primarily about Mainstream American Jazz, not any other type of Jazz.

Kind regards
Tom

Tom,

It has been my experience lately here in America with some younger musicians that they neglect to remember the Jazz legends of the past in having more concern with the more un-meaningful technique approach rather than the melodic continuity of a solo.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi Danny!

It does sound quite a challenge in the US regarding Jazz and trying to maintain a sense of continuity. What I am aware of is the each new generation has to learn and integrate things for itself, and potentially reinvent the wheel or at least develop a workable model of one. Too many times in musical history it seems that trends go from "unmusical" to "musical" in the ears of the beholders, as strides forward are made and then are integrated with what has gone before.

Much of what happens in Northern Europe has developed from Folk and Classical traditions, and also connections with the Middle East and elsewhere, so maybe has more sense of diversity and less sense of 'legends' to remember/commemorate.
 
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